Goods/Computer

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Analog Computer

Analog Computer
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Analogue Electronics

Analogue Electronics
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Technological Overview of Electronics[edit]

Electronics Generations:

  1. Analogue Electronics (TL:4-6)
  2. Macroelectronics (TL:4-6) (Conventional Electronics or Digital Electronics)
  3. Microelectronics (TL:7-9)
  4. Optoelectronics (TL:10-12)
  5. Myelotronics (TL:13-15)
  6. Claytronics (TL:16-18)
  7. Nanotronics (TL:19-21)
  8. Fuzzy Electronics (TL:19-21)
  9. Atomtronics (TL:22-24)
  10. Psychotronics (TL:25-27)

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Anti-Missile Program

Ship-Turret-WH-Keith-CT-Starter-Trav-Pg-33 03-July-2018a.jpg

The Anti-Missile Program is designed to coordinate all shipboard wepons and other system to stop or mitigate missile (GUW) fire. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Defensive programs are used to protect a starship against enemy action and particularly guided weapons.

  • Anti-missile allows any or all laser and kinetic weaponry to fire at enemy missiles which have targeted the ship during the preceding movement phase. [2]
  • The target and multitarget programs are not required. Other programs do not overtly affect the functioning of this program.

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Defensive Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [8]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [9]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [10]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  9. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  10. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Anti-hijack Program

Comp-Prog-Dav-R-Deitrick-Starter-Trav-Page-16 16-July-2018a.jpg

The Anti-hijack Program is designed to prevent piracy or make it vastly more difficult. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Routine programs are used to operate systems other than weaponry, and without regard to violent interaction.

  • Anti-hijack protects the ship against potential takeovers. This program constantly monitors conditions within the starship, and automatically locks the access doors to the bridge and controls when a hijack situation occurs.
  • Because this system is not foolproof, would-be hijackers may gain access in spite of the program.
  • Some versions of the program have full environmental controls and can even initiate self-destruct commands. [2]

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Routine Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and the computers operating them are extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary.

Standard Software Packages: Each computer comes with a software package of programs for use with the equipment. Because each computer may be put to a different use, their software package consists of a credit in MCr equal to the model number of the computer (treat 1bis and 2bis as 1 and 2 respectively). This credit may not be converted to cash. [10]

Computer programs (…especially starship programs as required for starship operations) are available, athough for relatively high price. It is also possible that such programs may be written by crew members with computer skill. The individual must have access to a computer which will handle the intended program, knowledge of the skill being incorporated, and no other duties, responsibilities, or distractions during each week of work programming. [11]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38-39.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  9. Steve DanielsJim McLeanChristopher Thrash. Far Trader (Steve Jackson Games, 1999), 68.
  10. Marc Miller. Starter Traveller (Game Designers Workshop, 1983), 10.
  11. Marc Miller. Starter Traveller (Game Designers Workshop, 1983), 13.
 

Astrogation Computer

Astrogation Computer
Imperial-Sunburst-Yellow-wiki.png
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see Ship Computer
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Atomtronics

Atomtronics
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Technological Overview of Electronics[edit]

Electronics Generations:

  1. Analogue Electronics (TL:4-6)
  2. Macroelectronics (TL:4-6) (Conventional Electronics or Digital Electronics)
  3. Microelectronics (TL:7-9)
  4. Optoelectronics (TL:10-12)
  5. Myelotronics (TL:13-15)
  6. Claytronics (TL:16-18)
  7. Nanotronics (TL:19-21)
  8. Fuzzy Electronics (TL:19-21)
  9. Atomtronics (TL:22-24)
  10. Psychotronics (TL:25-27)

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Auto/Evade Program

Wiki Navy.png

The Auto/Evade Program is designed to allow a ship to use evasive maneauver to avoid enemy weapon fire. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Defensive programs are used to protect a starship against enemy action.

  • Auto/evade is a series of six programs, similar to the maneuver/evade program series except less capable, which automatically produce minor movement for a ship, thus reducing the chances of the ship being hit by enemy weapons fire.
  • Pilot expertise enhances the effectiveness of the program.
  • In addition, these programs allow the use of the maneuver drive as required, in lieu of the normal maneuver program.
  • The Maneuver/Evade Program performs a similar function, and is generally considered more effective. [2]

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Defensive Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [8]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [9]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existing or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [10]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  9. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  10. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Automaton

Imperial-Sunburst-Sun-Scouts-wiki.png

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Expected Artificial Intelligence Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Bis

Comp-Prog-Dav-R-Deitrick-Starter-Trav-Page-16 16-July-2018a.jpg

Bis indicates an improved model of a ship's computer capable of handling more programs and a higher jump drive capability.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

A Ship’s Computer also transmits control impulses for maneuver and jump drives, and conducts the routine operation of all ship systems. What the computer actually does is based on the programs actually installed and operating at any one time. [1]

Selected Ship's Computer Types[edit]

  1. Model/1 Computer (including the Model/1fib and the Model/1bis)
  2. Model/2 Computer (including the Model/2fib and the Model/2bis)
  3. Model/3 Computer (including the Model/3fib)
  4. Model/4 Computer (including the Model/4fib)
  5. Model/5 Computer (including the Model/5fib)
  6. Model/6 Computer (including the Model/6fib)
  7. Model/7 Computer (including the Model/7fib)
  8. Model/8 Computer (including the Model/8fib)
  9. Model/9 Computer (including the Model/9fib)

Selected Ship's Computer Modifiers[edit]

  • bis - From the old Terran French word bis, which translates as "again".
    • It is functionally an enhanced computer.
  • fib - A contraction of Fibre Optic Computer.
    • It is functionally a computer protected against EMP or excess radiation.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Ship’s Computers within Charted Space are intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for use under hard vacuum and heavy exposure to cosmic radiation if necessary. [2]

Computer Overview[edit]

One overall computer for the ship must be specified; the basic requirement for this computer is based on the tonnage of the ship. The catalogued computer models indicate the model number, price, tonnage, CPU, and storage minimum ship size, energy point requirement, and tech level. [3]

  • Model number is the relative size of the computer, and corresponds to the computer model numbers in earlier ship catalogues.
  • Prices are given in megacredits.
  • Tonnage is the number of interior tons required for the installation of the computer.
  • CPU and storage capacity are included for use regarding computer programming.
  • Ship size shows the hull tonnage code which requires a certain computer as a minimum. For instance, a 10,000 ton ship has hull code K, and requires at least a Model/4 computer to be installed.
  • Tech level shows the minimum expected tech level required to build the indicated computer.
  • Energy point requirement is the number of energy points which must be committed to powering the computer.

Computer model also indicates the size of the jump which the computer can safely control.[4]

  • A Model/1 computer is required on a ship which makes a Jump-1 trip, a Model/5 computer is required on a ship which makes a Jump-5 trip.
  • Computer models greater than Model/6 do not allow greater jumps, and in any case, the ship would require the appropriate jump drive.
  • The Bis models are capable of controlling a jump one higher than their model numbers. Model/1 bis is capable of controlling a Jump-2 trip.
  • Models bis and fib are often notated with a letter in parentheses after the model number. This letter is the Universal Ship Profile code for the computer. Thus, the USP code for a Model/5 fib is E.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc MillerFrank ChadwickJohn Harshman. High Guard (Game Designers Workshop, 1980), 28.
  4. Marc MillerFrank ChadwickJohn Harshman. High Guard (Game Designers Workshop, 1980), 28.
 

Brain

Computer-CT-Liz-Danforth-Traveller-Book-pg-70 19-August-2019b.jpg

A Brain is a sophisticated Bright Age Information Technology computer without a significant personality. [1]

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please see the following AAB Library Data articles for more information:



Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

Brains, Minds & Personalities[edit]

Very advanced computers begin to develop various types of autonomous programming and are referred to with other specialized terms:

Brains, Minds & Personalities
Term Remarks
Brain A Brain is a sophisticated Bright Age Information Technology computer without a significant personality. [2]
Mind A Mind is a sophisticated Bright Age Information Technology computer with a significant personality. [3]
Personality A Personality is a Bright to Brilliant Age feature of sophisticated computers capable of high levels of autonomous thought and independent decision-making. [4]

NOTES: the differences between a brain and a mind are very negligible. There is significant overlap between the definitions, both formally and informally. As a generality, brains are lower performance and minds are higher performance. Brains were first operated without personalities. Later models began to include lower quality personalities. All minds are designed from the onset to include high quality personalities.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Expected Artificial Intelligence Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Marc Miller. "Computers, Consoles, and Controllers." T5 Core Rules (2013): 515-519.
  2. Marc Miller. "Computers, Consoles, and Controllers." T5 Core Rules (2013): 515-519.
  3. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  4. Marc Miller. "Personalities and Brains." T5 Core Rules (2013): 522-525.
 

CABAI Project

Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif

The CABAI Project is an experimental mind control device.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

It is similar to SuSAGs Better than Life biochip and transplanted into the hypothalamus and other regions of the brain to augment behavior alteration of a human hormonal, neuronal, axonal and cerebral.

CABAI biochips can be implanted within two hours and removed within a quarter of the time.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The Computer Augmented Behavioral Alteration had been developed by a team at the Bioengineering Research Bureau of Shishmadarshag LIC, led by professor Rae Tuliiga.

The project soon became a military secret of Strephon's scientists, but became known to public by several accidents. In 1115 a volunteer stole an autorifle and fired into a crowd of people killing seven and injuring fourteen others.

In 1118, thieves broke into the research lab and took computer records.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Calculator

Calculator
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type Tool
Tech Level TL–6
Cost Cr50
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight 0.1 kg
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

A Calculator is a small electronic device used to do basic mathematical calculations.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

In their original production styles, they are primitive, have limited mathematical capabilities, and are relatively expensive, starting at around Cr50. The late TL–8 models are quite capable, with some limited programmability and graphic display capability, and very cheap. Some limited use TL–8 calculators can be produced for as little as Cr0.1 in massive numbers as novelty items.

Most calculators run on batteries, which allow use for a year or more, or incorporate small solar cells to provide all the power they need.

Calculators do not have external connections, relying upon the user to input numbers and apply the results manually.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Originally produced at TL–6, they continue to be produced through TL–8 where they are gradually replaced by more flexible Handcomps.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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City Brain

City Brain
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Computer

Computer-CT-Liz-Danforth-Traveller-Book-pg-70 19-August-2019b.jpg

A Computer is a tangible device using information technology to manipulate data and make calculations.

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please see the following AAB Library Data articles for more information:



Description (Specifications)[edit]

Computers are rated according to a vast variety of characteristics and capabilities, but general quality paradigms have been established.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

Computer Types[edit]

Computer:

  1. Astrogation Computer
  2. Computer Implant
  3. Computer Personality
  4. Control Console
  5. Control Panel
  6. Fiber Optic Computer
  7. Fire Control Computer
  8. Flight Computer
  9. Hand Computer
  10. House Brain
  11. Map Box
  12. Master Fire Director (MFD)
  13. Minicomputer
  14. Neural Net
  15. Ship Brain
  16. Ship Mind
  17. Ship's Computer
  18. Traffic Net
  19. Workstation

Processor:

  1. Linear Processor
  2. Parallel Processor
  3. Synaptic Processor

Macroelectronics or Microelectronics?[edit]

Vignette 32:
The stewardess brought the kid in as part of the tour and right away he pissed me off.

“Why’s the computer so big? Why’s it so slow? Why does it have a tap on the front?”

I didn’t want to look at the runt so I turned to the computer. I ran a hand along the edge of room-filling cylinder.

“She’s not slow, she’s tough. Her core isn’t weak silicon or habridide, she’s hardwired with microscopic gold wiring. That means she runs slower as you can only shrink it so much. But the radiation in Jump would fry anything lesser. Even so, that sweet core is surrounded by a foot thick lead-carbide shield to protect it against solar radiation. A foot of simple gel insulation for temperature control. Then the proton tanks, between six feet of dense water that captures the results of proton decay caused by the Jump gravitational changes. That’s what the tap is for, to drain the tanks. Then the wall sensors that detect the radiation we can’t shield against and tell this baby to reset when it detects something that might cause a miscalculation.

“This panel over here…” I turned round to demonstrate the controls, they’d gone. [1]

Computer Control Standards[edit]

Computer Controls: In almost all cases where the ship's computer can control a given ship function (gravity, doors, etc.), orders fed in at the central bridge computer take precedence over those fed in at local controls. Only if the computer is inoperative will a computer override be ineffective.[2] Some ships have been known to be built with a different system set-up, but this arrangement is commonplace on most vessels within Charted Space. [3]

Brains, Minds & Personalities[edit]

Very advanced computers begin to develop various types of autonomous programming and are referred to with other specialized terms:

Brains, Minds & Personalities
Term Remarks
Brain A Brain is a sophisticated Bright Age Information Technology computer without a significant personality. [4]
Mind A Mind is a sophisticated Bright Age Information Technology computer with a significant personality. [5]
Personality A Personality is a Bright to Brilliant Age feature of sophisticated computers capable of high levels of autonomous thought and independent decision-making. [6]

NOTES: the differences between a brain and a mind are very negligible. There is significant overlap between the definitions, both formally and informally. As a generality, brains are lower performance and minds are higher performance. Brains were first operated with personalities. Later models began to include lower quality personalities. All minds are designed from the onset to include high quality personalities.

Mind Control Technology[edit]

No information yet available.

NBIC Technologies[edit]

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Computers are a foundational technology underlying many later developments including robots, starships, artificial intelligence, and much, much more.

The development of Information Technology (IT) and particularly the key device of IT, the computer is a key advancement of any technological civilization.

  • Computer technology greatly assists in the advancement of knowledge. Scientists used it to better store, collate, and push out the boundaries of scientific knowledge. Linguists use it to catalogue known languages and improve universal translators. Bureaucrats use it to aid in process of governance, massively increasing efficiency.
  • Nearly every tech level of advancement leads to an exponential increase in pure research capability and a greatly sped up doubling of existing knowledge.
  • Computers and other forms of data processing and storage expand the extilligence of a civilization, which is to say its ability to pass on learning from one generation to the next.

Almost all are designed to use lower technology repair components in most functionalities. For this reason, ship’s computers tend to be much larger and more voluminous than strictly function-based microelectronics.

Expected Artificial Intelligence Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

Expected Computer Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

Technological Overview of Computers[edit]

Epochal Technological Development: Information Technology is at its earliest conceptual state and slowly grows into mechanical calculative devices to early electronics to the first true computers and beyond.

Computer Autonomy:

Information Age Societies (Calculative Computers)[edit]

Technological Period: TL:1-9 and Tech-Name: Ur-Tech
Common Characteristics: Digital Networks, High scarcity, Prototype Nanotech, Calculative ("Calculating Machines"), Automatons, Low Autonomous Robots, etc.
Tech Epoch TL-Range Remarks
Tool Making Epoch TL:1-3 COMPUTERS: The abacus and the quipu represent early calculating tech. they are simple, mechanical processors that help a sophont keep large numbers of calculations in memory. Mathematics makes great leaps forward with the development of algebra, trigonometry, and calculus.
Division of Labor Epoch TL:4-6 COMPUTERS: The first analog computers and calculators greatly enhance business and academic endeavors. Mechanical and early electronic calculators become fixtures. Electric devices, polymers, and early electronics fuel continuing progress. Designers use classic Lovelacian programming and aspire to build the first Babbage machines. Many sophont societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/1 and Model/1 bis processors.
Processor Epoch TL:7-9 COMPUTERS: Programmable computers come into vogue as the analog is replaced by the digital. Transistors make way for microchips; desktop processors soon become a feature of home, business, and school. Massive parallel processors fill entire rooms and supersede earlier technologies. The first supercomputers can often beat even expert humans at games like chess due to phenomenal calculating abilities and vast memory banks. Photonic and gravitic energy transmission as well as bio-computing replace many of the earlier generations of electronics. Voice-activated processors are more user-friendly than ever before. Many societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/2, Model/2 bis, and even Model/3 processors.

Bright Age Societies (Bright Computers)[edit]

Technological Period: TL:10-18 and Tech-Name: Stell-Tech
Common Characteristics: Intelligent Networks, Low Scarcity, Weak nanotech, Synaptic processors, Positronic Brains, Cognitive ("Thinking Machines"), High Autonomous Robots, etc.
Tech Epoch TL-Range Remarks
Gravitics Epoch TL:10-12 COMPUTERS: Synaptic processors and positronic brains are vastly more capable than earlier generations of processor technology. Some advanced robots can fool inexpert humans. Expert roboticists call these low autonomous robots. Still, a well-trained expert sophont can often outthink and outperform advanced thinking machines from this epoch. Fluidic and magnetic energy transmission increase processing speed. Semi-organic facility and early ship brains become common. Many societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/4, Model/5, and Model/6 processors.
Biologicals Epoch TL:13-15 COMPUTERS: High autonomous robots outperform many educated experts across many fields. They still can’t match the apex professors, but they can perform perfectly well at the professional level. Holocrystals and advanced bio-compumetrics are increasing functioning to billions of actions per nanosecond. Computer brain implants allow complete rehabilitation and restoration of function to almost all individuals who were formerly handicapped. Infomorphs and downloadable brains supplement wafertech. Pseudoreality simulators show amazing promise. Many societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/7, Model/8, and Model/9 processors.
Artificials Epoch TL:16-18 COMPUTERS: High autonomous robots outperform many educated experts across many fields. They still can’t match the apex professors, but they can perform perfectly well at the professional level. Holocrystals and advanced bio-compumetrics are increasing functioning to billions of actions per nanosecond. Computer brain implants allow complete rehabilitation and restoration of function to almost all individuals who were formerly handicapped. Infomorphs and downloadable brains supplement wafertech. Pseudoreality simulators show amazing promise. Many societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/7, Model/8, and Model/9 processors. Hop Drives begin to use more advanced Ship's Computers.

Brilliant Age Societies (Brilliant Computers)[edit]

Technological Period: TL:19-27 and Tech-Name: Ultra-Tech
Common Characteristics: Delegative Rule (AI), Post-Scarcity, Strong nanotech, Emotive ("Dreaming or Feeling Machines"), Self-Aware Robots, etc.
Tech Epoch TL-Range Remarks
Matter Transport Epoch, Transformations Epoch, and Psionics Epoch TL:19-21, TL:22-24, and TL:25-27 COMPUTERS: Some Imperial scientists have quietly made the observation that psionic science may underlay future societal and technological developments. True Artificial Intelligence is another widely anticipated factor. It is anticipated that true artificial intelligence, thinking, feeling machines whose capabilities may exceed organic sophont minds may coalesce over this tech period, the Ultra Period.

Beyond Brilliance[edit]

Technological Period: TL:28-30 & TL:31-33 and Tech-Name: Dei-Tech & Omni-Tech
Common Characteristics: Mass Minds, Delegative Rule (AI), Zero-Scarcity, Very Strong nanotech, Omni-Heuristic ("Deific Machines"), etc.
Tech Epoch TL-Range Remarks
Transcendent Epoch
& Ascendant Epoch
TL:28-30 & TL:31-33 COMPUTERS: Even futurists have a hard time guessing what form electronics will take these tech epochs or even whether they will exist at all.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article has Metadata
62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Felbrigg Herriot
  2. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  3. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  4. Marc Miller. "Computers, Consoles, and Controllers." T5 Core Rules (2013): 515-519.
  5. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  6. Marc Miller. "Personalities and Brains." T5 Core Rules (2013): 522-525.
 

Computer Personality

Wiki Navy.png

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Computer Software

Computer-CT-Liz-Danforth-Traveller-Book-pg-70 19-August-2019b.jpg

Computer Software or Programs are a key part of the success of modern starships.

  • A great variety of programs are available that serve nearly every conceivable need.

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please see the following AAB Library Data articles for more information:



Description (Specifications)[edit]

Computer Software: Computers are specified in terms of their capacity to process and store programs. All programs in the computer's CPU are processed simultaneously, while programs in storage are available on a revolving basis to replace those in the CPU as needed. For example, a model/1 computer has a CPU capacity of two, and an additional storage capacity of four. The computer might have in it six programs (each of size or space one): “Return fire,” “Predict-1,” “Gunner interact,” “Auto/evade,” “Maneuver,” and “Target.” Of these six, only two (the capacity limit of the CPU) can function at any one time. [1]

Specific programs may be removed from the computer and others inserted. A starship might operate both “Jump-1” and “Navigation” programs for the performance of an interstellar jump. Both programs would be fed into the computer, but only after sufficient space had been cleared (…perhaps by removing the “Maneuver” and “Auto-evade” programs). [2]

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Offensive Programs:

Defensive Programs:

Routine Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and the computers operating them are extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary.

Standard Software Package[edit]

Standard Software Packages: Each computer comes with a software package of programs for use with the equipment. Because each computer may be put to a different use, their software package consists of a credit in MCr equal to the model number of the computer (treat 1 bis and 2 bis as 1 and 2 respectively). This credit may not be converted to cash. [22]

Computer programs (…especially starship programs as required for starship operations) are available, athough for relatively high price. It is also possible that such programs may be written by crew members with computer skill. The individual must have access to a computer which will handle the intended program, knowledge of the skill being incorporated, and no other duties, responsibilities, or distractions during each week of work programming. [23]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  2. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  9. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  10. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  11. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  12. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  13. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  14. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  15. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  16. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  17. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  18. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38-39.
  19. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  20. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  21. Steve DanielsJim McLeanChristopher Thrash. Far Trader (Steve Jackson Games, 1999), 68.
  22. Marc Miller. Starter Traveller (Game Designers Workshop, 1983), 10.
  23. Marc Miller. Starter Traveller (Game Designers Workshop, 1983), 13.
 

Computer Technology of Charted Space

Computer-CT-Liz-Danforth-Traveller-Book-pg-70 19-August-2019b.jpg

Computer Technology of Charted Space: Computers are machines using various stages of information technology to perform increasingly sophisticated calculations, from the earliest clockwork Babbage machines, performing simple mathematical caculations, to the most advanced TL-15 Bright computers performing sophisticated, heuristic maths. Self-Aware machines capable of achieving sentience, sapience, and full sophonce are projected to appear in the near future.

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please see the following AAB Library Data articles for more information:

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Computers are rated according to a vast variety of characteristics and capabilities, but general quality paradigms have been established.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

Computer Types[edit]

Computer:

  1. Computer Implant
  2. Control Console
  3. Control Panel
  4. Fire Control Computer
  5. Hand Computer
  6. House Brain
  7. Map Box
  8. Neural Net
  9. Ship's Computer
  10. Workstation

Turing Test[edit]

[Once the machine thinking method has started, it would not take long to outstrip our feeble powers. 
... At some stage therefore we should have to expect the machines to take control, in the way that is mentioned in Samuel Butler's ‘Erewhon.’]
- Terran scientist, Alan Turing in 1951 CE, speaking about a future in which machines outperform human sophonts intellectually.

A Turing Test is a test of artificial intelligence invented by a scientist from the Terran past. Modern versions of it are still in use within the Third Imperium. The Rule of Man established the test within Charted Space even though similar testing mechanisms existed within several sophont cultures including the Vilani Ziru Sirka.

  • The Turing Test is one of the best known tests for determining artificial intelligence ratings within Charted Space. It was developed on old Terra by a cryptological code breaker and mathematician named Alan Turing.
  • The Turing Test is essentially one of social interaction. Can a robot convince a conventional sophont that it is a fellow mind through natural conversation or dialogue that flows? Or does it fail, and appear obviously robotic?
  • Increasingly sophisticated Turing Tests have been developed over the millenia. AB-101 broke many records with its amazing sophistication and lifelike behavior. More breakthroughs are expected in the near future.

Turing Ratings[edit]

Turing Ratings
TR Class IQ SQ Remarks
Sub-Turing X X X X
Turing X X X X
Supra-Turing X X X X

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The development of Information Technology (IT) and particularly the key device of IT, the computer is a key advancement of any technological civilization.

  • Computer technology greatly assists in the advancement of knowledge. Scientists used it to better store, collate, and push out the boundaries of scientific knowledge. Linguists use it to catalogue known languages and improve universal translators. Bureaucrats use it to aid in process of governance, massively increasing efficiency.
  • Nearly every tech level of advancement leads to an exponential increase in pure research capability and a greatly sped up doubling of existing knowledge.
  • Computers and other forms of data processing and storage expand the extilligence of a civilization, which is to say its ability to pass on learning from one generation to the next.

Expected Computer Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

Epochal Robotic Technology Periods[edit]

Computer Autonomy:

Information Age Societies (Calculative Computers)[edit]

Technological Period: TL:1-9 and Tech-Name: Ur-Tech
Common Characteristics: Digital Networks, High scarcity, Prototype Nanotech, Calculative ("Calculating machines"), Automatons, Low Autonomous Robots, etc.
Tech Epoch TL-Range Remarks
Tool Making Epoch TL:1-3 COMPUTERS: The abacus and the quipu represent early calculating tech. they are simple, mechanical processors that help a sophont keep large numbers of calculations in memory. Mathematics makes great leaps forward with the development of algebra, trigonometry, and calculus.
Division of Labor Epoch TL:4-6 COMPUTERS: The first analog computers and calculators greatly enhance business and academic endeavors. Mechanical and early electronic calculators become fixtures. Electric devices, polymers, and early electronics fuel continuing progress. Designers use classic Lovelacian programming and aspire to build the first Babbage machines. Many sophont societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/1 and Model/1 bis processors.
Processor Epoch TL:7-9 COMPUTERS: Programmable computers come into vogue as the analog is replaced by the digital. Transistors make way for microchips; desktop processors soon become a feature of home, business, and school. Massive parallel processors fill entire rooms and supersede earlier technologies. The first supercomputers can often beat even expert humans at games like chess due to phenomenal calculating abilities and vast memory banks. Photonic and gravitic energy transmission as well as bio-computing replace many of the earlier generations of electronics. Voice-activated processors are more user-friendly than ever before. Many societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/2, Model/2 bis, and even Model/3 processors.

Bright Age Societies (Bright Computers)[edit]

Technological Period: TL:10-18 and Tech-Name: Stell-Tech
Common Characteristics: Intelligent Networks, Low Scarcity, Weak nanotech, Synaptic processors, Positronic Brains, Cognitive ("Thinking machines"), High Autonomous Robots, etc.
Tech Epoch TL-Range Remarks
Gravitics Epoch TL:10-12 COMPUTERS: Synaptic processors and positronic brains are vastly more capable than earlier generations of processor technology. Some advanced robots can fool inexpert humans. Expert roboticists call these low autonomous robots. Still, a well-trained expert sophont can often outthink and outperform advanced thinking machines from this epoch. Fluidic and magnetic energy transmission increase processing speed. Semi-organic facility and early ship brains become common. Many societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/4, Model/5, and Model/6 processors.
Biologicals Epoch TL:13-15 COMPUTERS: High autonomous robots outperform many educated experts across many fields. They still can’t match the apex professors, but they can perform perfectly well at the professional level. Holocrystals and advanced bio-compumetrics are increasing functioning to billions of actions per nanosecond. Computer brain implants allow complete rehabilitation and restoration of function to almost all individuals who were formerly handicapped. Infomorphs and downloadable brains supplement wafertech. Pseudoreality simulators show amazing promise. Many societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/7, Model/8, and Model/9 processors.
Artificials Epoch TL:16-18 COMPUTERS: High autonomous robots outperform many educated experts across many fields. They still can’t match the apex professors, but they can perform perfectly well at the professional level. Holocrystals and advanced bio-compumetrics are increasing functioning to billions of actions per nanosecond. Computer brain implants allow complete rehabilitation and restoration of function to almost all individuals who were formerly handicapped. Infomorphs and downloadable brains supplement wafertech. Pseudoreality simulators show amazing promise. Many societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/7, Model/8, and Model/9 processors. Hop Drives begin to use more advanced Ship's Computers.

Brilliant Age Societies (Brilliant Computers)[edit]

Technological Period: TL:19-27 and Tech-Name: Ultra-Tech
Common Characteristics: Delegative Rule (AI), Post-Scarcity, Strong nanotech, Emotive ("Dreaming or Feeling machines"), Self-Aware Robots, etc.
Tech Epoch TL-Range Remarks
Matter Transport Epoch, Transformations Epoch, and Psionics Epoch TL:19-21, TL:22-24, and TL:25-27 COMPUTERS: Some Imperial scientists have quietly made the observation that psionic science may underlay future societal and technological developments. True Artificial Intelligence is another widely anticipated factor. It is anticipated that true artificial intelligence, thinking, feeling machines whose capabilities may exceed organic sophont minds may coalesce over this tech period, the Ultra Period.

Beyond Brilliance[edit]

Technological Period: TL:28-30 & TL:31-33 and Tech-Name: Dei-Tech & Omni-Tech
Common Characteristics: Delegative Rule (AI), Post-Scarcity, Strong nanotech, Emotive ("Dreaming or Feeling machines"), Self-Aware Robots, etc.
Tech Epoch TL-Range Remarks
Transcendent Epoch & Ascendant Epoch TL:28-30 & TL:31-33 COMPUTERS: Even futurists have a hard time guessing what form electronics will take these tech epochs or even whether they will exist at all.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Computronium

Computer-CT-Liz-Danforth-Traveller-Book-pg-70 19-August-2019b.jpg

Computronium is a golden grail of Information Technology, a material which is a near perfect medium for the storage of data.

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please see the following AAB Library Data articles for more information:



Description (Specifications)[edit]

The contemporary holo crystals of TL:13-15 Charted Space are vastly superior to the silicon electronics used by TL:7-9 societies. However, science and science fiction have long predicted a hypothetically perfect memory storage device known as computronium, with near unlimited storage space and capabilities to process calculations in the many trillions per yoctosecond.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No known science can produce such a substance... yet. Some theories hypothesize that such material can only be artificially synthesized or found in the cores of neutron stars or black holes. Others have supposed that it may exist in jump space. Another theory lends that a cold, degenerate star could be used in this manner.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article has Metadata
Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Computronium. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. The text of Wikipedia is available under the Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Console

Imperial-Sunburst-Yellow-wiki.png

A Console is a kind of electronic control station or interface aboard a ship.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

A console is an electronic device that allows the user to interface with a function or piece of equipment/machinery aboard the ship and monitor or control it. These functions or pieces of machinery are grouped together into similar groups for ease of use by trained crew members. For example, the Astrogation Console may have access to the Computer, Jump Drives and Power Plant all of which come into play when determining a Jump. Meanwhile the Pilots Console will have access to the Maneuver Drive, Power Plant and Sensors. [2]

  • An individual Console can oversee and interact with any number of Control Panels but must share out its Skill Asset amongst them when left to its own devices. [3]
  • Control Consoles are the typical set-up for consoles and is required for the pilot position, but you can also find Operating Consoles which are slightly less sophisticated and cheaper and finally Workstations which are the least sophisticated and cheapest set-ups. Space is a big factor in Consoles and Workstations with more being better and minimizing mishaps through regular use. [4]
  • Typically, each console is manned by 1 crew member, but it is possible to have 1 crew member oversee 3 consoles with the console itself keeping an eye on basic functions through its skill asset while the crew member deals with an issue on another console. [5]

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

Typical Console Functions & Permissions[edit]

The following table represents a selection of typical consoles and which functions they perform, and which crew they allow to access to the programs and subsystems: [6]

Typical Console Functions & Permissions
Crewsophont Role Programs / Access Remarks
Pilot / Captain Command Maneuver Drive, Power Plant, Sensors, etc. No information yet available.
Astrogator Astrogation Ship's Computer, Jump Drive, etc. No information yet available.
Engineer Engineering Power Plant, Maneuver Drive, Jump Drive, Life Support, etc. No information yet available.
Gunner Weapons Weapons, Sensors, Defenses, etc. No information yet available.
Cargo Master Freight Cargo Bay Doors, Cargo Bays, Cargo, etc. No information yet available.
Marine Security Hatches, Interior Sensors, Armoury, etc. No information yet available.
Doctor Medical Clinic, Med Scanners, etc. No information yet available.
Steward Hospitality Passengers, Staterooms, Airlocks, etc. No information yet available.

Computer Control Standards[edit]

Computer Controls: In almost all cases where the ship's computer can control a given ship function (gravity, doors, etc.), orders fed in at the central bridge computer take precedence over those fed in at local controls. Only if the computer is inoperative will a computer override be ineffective.[7] Some ships have been known to be built with a different system set-up, but this arrangement is commonplace on most vessels within Charted Space. [8]

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Consoles are touch screen interfaces with analogue keyboards as backup and in the case of a Pilots Console may have a physical joystick and throttle lever. Higher Tech Level Consoles will have voice control features and may even have some limited AI response system. [9]

A console base C+S is equal to the ship's Tech Level. This is shared out between its various functions. So, a typical pilot's Consoles on a TL-9 Ship could allocate 3 to each Power Plant, Maneuver Drive and Sensor functions when not directly controlled by the pilot. Although it would probably be better as 5 for Sensors, 3 for Maneuver Drive and 1 for the Power Plant during easy/routine operations. [10]

Expected Console Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Eric Lyon-Taylor & Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Eric Lyon-Taylor
  3. An unpublished factoid written by Eric Lyon-Taylor
  4. An unpublished factoid written by Eric Lyon-Taylor
  5. An unpublished factoid written by Eric Lyon-Taylor
  6. An unpublished factoid written by Eric Lyon-Taylor & Maksim-Smelchak
  7. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  8. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  9. An unpublished factoid written by Eric Lyon-Taylor
  10. An unpublished factoid written by Eric Lyon-Taylor
 

Control Console

Imperial-Sunburst-Yellow-wiki.png

A Control Console combines Control Panels and display devices that allow operator input and provide feedback.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Interior fittings: Deck plans typically show various furnishings and fittings which appear within the ship.[1] Furniture hinders movement and may, in some instances, blocks sighting and weapon fire as well.[2]

Control Consoles: Those provided with chairs are low banks of controls and displays. Each console has a specific function; the crewperson should feel free to designate the functions monitored from a particular console where these are not already designated or obvious.[3]

Stand-up consoles are set higher and are normally monitor panels not intended for constant use.[4]


The practical operation of a ship would be impossible without an extensive network of controls. Almost every mechanism on a ship has one or more control panels, input-output devices attached directly to the item. For convenience and accessibility these control panels are mounted in consoles, forming workstations for the crew.

Console Types[edit]

A console is a unit containing interconnected hardware. This typically consists of a housing, which may be as small as a wall panel or a desk or may be a walk-in area as large as a stateroom. The surface or exterior of the housing mounts one or more control panels, along with any input devices such as keyboards or levers and associated data feedback equipment such as display screens or gauges. The interior of the console contains a complex network of mechanical connectors, piping, cabling, linkages and relays, power supplies, and electronic equipment.

There are three main types of Console:

General Console
A General Console allows the user to interact with data for administrative purposes. The ship's computer provides access to common office activities: language use, math, communications, information, and entertainment.

  • A General Console may also be referred to as a Data Station.

Operating Console
An Operating Console allows the user to monitor the activities of a mechanism or system and to make adjustments to its operation. Operating Consoles are best adapted to mechanisms which operate continuously, and whose operation must be adjusted for efficiency or for changed circumstances.

Command Console
A Command Console allows specialized input to the ship's control systems or computer with special interfaces: a yolk, joystick, steering wheel, or tiller to convert fine hand or manipulator motions to control signals. It may have foot or ped controls to allow additional simultaneous input.

  • A pilot's position is always laid out as a Command Console.

Console Sizes[edit]

Consoles come in a variety of sizes, determined by need and by the space available. The following units are representative:

A Console is permanently installed in place as part of a Workstation: it cannot be moved to other locations. The Console is related to the size of the User; while the volume occupied by its mechanical components or electronic equipment may be quite small, the Console itself must be large enough to accommodate displays and input devices as well as the user.

Display Types[edit]

A console may be augmented with improved data displays.

Heads-up Displays:
The device displays information in pictoral form in the operator's field of view, which avoids the need for the operator to look at separate panels or screens.

  • A basic heads-up display projects an image in the operator's eyeline. It will generally follow the operator's eye position but can be locked in place. It is available at TL-9
  • The holographic version displays readings and output in an interactive 3D form. It is available at TL-13.

Large Holodisplay.

  • A large holodisplay/plotter unit used for showing all manner of 3D tactical, trajectory, flight path, and sensor information, as well as displaying 3D communications and recordings. It is available at TL-12

Computer Control Standards[edit]

Computer Controls: In almost all cases where the ship's computer can control a given ship function (gravity, doors, etc.), orders fed in at the central bridge computer take precedence over those fed in at local controls. Only if the computer is inoperative will a computer override be ineffective.[5] Some ships have been known to be built with a different system set-up, but this arrangement is commonplace on most vessels within Charted Space. [6]

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Consoles are touch screen interfaces with analogue keyboards as backup and in the case of a Pilots Console may have a physical joystick and throttle lever. Higher Tech Level Consoles will have voice control features and may even have some limited AI response system. [7]

A console base C+S is equal to the ship's Tech Level. This is shared out between its various functions. So, a typical pilot's Consoles on a TL-9 Ship could allocate 3 to each Power Plant, Maneuver Drive and Sensor functions when not directly controlled by the pilot. Although it would probably be better as 5 for Sensors, 3 for Maneuver Drive and 1 for the Power Plant during easy/routine operations. [8]

Expected Console Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 5.
  2. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  3. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 5.
  4. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 5.
  5. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  6. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  7. An unpublished factoid written by Eric Lyon-Taylor
  8. An unpublished factoid written by Eric Lyon-Taylor
 

Data Clip

Data Clip
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Datanet

Wiki Navy.png

A Datanet is an electronic planetary data network.


Please see the following AAB Library Data articles for more information:




Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Digital Electronics

Macroelectronics
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Technological Overview of Electronics[edit]

Electronics Generations:

  1. Analogue Electronics (TL:4-6)
  2. Macroelectronics (TL:4-6) (Conventional Electronics or Digital Electronics)
  3. Microelectronics (TL:7-9)
  4. Optoelectronics (TL:10-12)
  5. Myelotronics (TL:13-15)
  6. Claytronics (TL:16-18)
  7. Nanotronics (TL:19-21)
  8. Fuzzy Electronics (TL:19-21)
  9. Atomtronics (TL:22-24)
  10. Psychotronics (TL:25-27)

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Double Fire Program

Target-Program-WH-Keith-CT-Starter-Trav-Pg-40 03-July-2018a.jpg

The Double Fire Program is designed to increase the volume of fire from shipboard weaponry. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Offensive programs are intended to allow the use of weapons mounted on a ship to damage or destroy enemy vessels.

  • Double fire allows a ship to draw excess power (if available) from the power plant and thus increase the output of laser weaponry. When this program is functioning, a vessel with an adequate power plant can fire a double beam or double pulse with laser weaponry.
  • When unmonitored and fired without limit, this program can cause malfunction, overload, or other damage within the power plant, manueauver drive, or associated systems. [2]

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Offensive Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [10]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [11]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [12]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  9. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  10. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  11. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  12. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

E-Circuit Module

E-Circuit Module
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

ECM Program

Wiki Navy.png

The ECM Program, or Electronic Counter Measures Program, is designed to confuse and misdirect enemy electronics, particularly sensors and guidance systems. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Defensive programs are used to protect a starship against enemy action.

  • ECM is an electronic countermeasures program which jams and confuses the homing heads of incoming missiles, forcing them to explode prematurely in many cases. During the laser return fire phase, it will destroy nearly all missiles in near-contact with the ship.
  • Most missiles are destroyed at sufficient distance to prevent damage to the ship although sometimes missiles detonating closer to the ship may cause minor or sometimes even major damage. [2]

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Defensive Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary.

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [8]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [9]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  9. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Electromechanical Computer

Electromechanical Computer
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Electronic Computer

Electronic Computer
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Electronics

Computer-CT-Liz-Danforth-Traveller-Book-pg-70 19-August-2019b.jpg

Electronics are a gateway technology leading to computers.

  • They enable and make possible advanced, pre-intelligent machinery and devices.
  • Later, more advanced versions and electronics create increasingly more advanced computers and other Information Technology devices.

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please see the following AAB Library Data articles for more information:



Description (Specifications)[edit]

Electronics comprises the physics, engineering, technology and applications that deal with the emission, flow and control of electrons in vacuum and matter. Electronics deals with electrical circuits that involve active electrical components such as vacuum tubes, transistors, diodes, integrated circuits, optoelectronics, and sensors, associated passive electrical components, and interconnection technologies. Commonly, electronic devices contain circuitry consisting primarily or exclusively of active semiconductors supplemented with passive elements; such a circuit is described as an electronic circuit.

An electronic component is any physical entity in an electronic system used to affect the electrons or their associated fields in a manner consistent with the intended function of the electronic system. Components are generally intended to be connected together, usually by being soldered to a printed circuit board (PCB), to create an electronic circuit with a particular function (for example an amplifier, radio receiver, or oscillator). Components may be packaged singly, or in more complex groups as integrated circuits. Some common electronic components are capacitors, inductors, resistors, diodes, transistors, etc. Components are often categorized as active (e.g. transistors and thyristors) or passive (e.g. resistors, diodes, inductors and capacitors).

Specialized Uses[edit]

Many kinds of specialized electronics exist including:

  • Astronics, specialized for interstellar navigational calculations and operation through the vacuum. Astronics are usually implemented in the form of an Astrogation Computer, often simply called a navigation computer.
  • Avionics, specialized for aircraft operation within a gaseous atmosphere. Avionics are usually implemented in the form of a Flight Computer.

Moore's Law[edit]

Moore's law is the observation that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles about every two years. The observation is named after Gordon Moore, an ancient Terran human, who wrote paper described a doubling every year in the number of components per integrated circuit and projected this rate of growth would continue for at least another decade. Moore's prediction proved accurate for several decades and was once used in the semiconductor industry to guide long-term planning and to set targets for research and development. Advancements in TL:7-9 digital electronics were once strongly linked to Moore's law. Moore's law describes a driving force of technological and social change, productivity, and economic growth. Moore's law is an observation and projection of a historical trend and not a physical or natural law.

Eventually, manufacturing paradigms for electronics technology changed the law which no longer held true. Advanced biotech, nanotech, and makertech changed the nature of electronics.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Information Technology, computers, and electronics are foundational technologies for Charted Space. Technologists and Educational Institute officers generally group these developments into technological epochs and periods.

Technological Overview of Electronics[edit]

Electronics Generations:

  1. Analogue Electronics (TL:4-6)
  2. Macroelectronics (TL:4-6) (Conventional Electronics or Digital Electronics)
  3. Microelectronics (TL:7-9)
  4. Optoelectronics (TL:10-12)
  5. Myelotronics (TL:13-15)
  6. Claytronics (TL:16-18)
  7. Nanotronics (TL:19-21)
  8. Fuzzy Electronics (TL:19-21)
  9. Atomtronics (TL:22-24)
  10. Psychotronics (TL:25-27)

Technological Stages of Electronic Development[edit]

Information Age Societies (Calculative Electronics)[edit]

Technological Period: TL:1-9 and Tech-Name: Ur-Tech
Common Characteristics: Digital Networks, High scarcity, Prototype Nanotech, Calculative ("Calculating machines"), Automatons, Low Autonomous Robots, etc.
Tech Epoch TL-Range Remarks
Tool Making Epoch TL:1-3 COMPUTERS: The abacus and the quipu represent early calculating tech. they are simple, mechanical processors that help a sophont keep large numbers of calculations in memory. Mathematics makes great leaps forward with the development of algebra, trigonometry, and calculus.
Division of Labor Epoch TL:4-6 COMPUTERS: The first solid state electronics appear in this tech epoch and are gradually electrified. Very limited electronics and simple circuits become available, but are rarely able to mainstream into consumer and military goods except in a limited fashion.
Processor Epoch TL:7-9 COMPUTERS: Workable electronics generally become widely available in the TL:7-9 epoch. Miniaturized Electronics appear in this period and are dubbed microelectronics. Chips and circuit boards are gradually miniaturized leading to incredible computing capabilities in very small devices such as handcomps.

Bright Age Societies (Bright Electronics)[edit]

Technological Period: TL:10-18 and Tech-Name: Stell-Tech
Common Characteristics: Intelligent Networks, Low Scarcity, Weak nanotech, Synaptic processors, Positronic Brains, Cognitive ("Thinking machines"), High Autonomous Robots, etc.
Tech Epoch TL-Range Remarks
Gravitics Epoch TL:10-12 COMPUTERS: The computers of this area revolutionize society allowing smart devices, intelligent city controllers, and mainstreamed interstellar travel: Jumpliners.
Biologicals Epoch TL:13-15 COMPUTERS: Cutting edge electronics at the TL:13-15 are often unrecognizable to earlier peoples. They often make use of subatomic microelectronic components, dedicated nanotechnology, or even organic components or biotech. Many scientists and futorologists assume that the trend of paradigmatic change will hold and the future kinds of electronics in advanced artifacts may be near unrecognizable to TL:13-15 societies.
Artificials Epoch TL:16-18 COMPUTERS: Current research into the Hop Drive will undoubtedly yield new kinds of Ship's Computers and vastly improved capabilities for FTL transportation. Current technologists and futurists are anticipating a paradigm change.

Brilliant Age Societies (Brilliant Electronics)[edit]

Technological Period: TL:19-27 and Tech-Name: Ultra-Tech
Common Characteristics: Delegative Rule (AI), Post-Scarcity, Strong nanotech, Emotive ("Dreaming or Feeling machines"), Self-Aware Robots, etc.
Tech Epoch TL-Range Remarks
Matter Transport Epoch, Transformations Epoch, and Psionics Epoch TL:19-21, TL:22-24, and TL:25-27 COMPUTERS: Some Imperial scientists have quietly made the observation that psionic science may underlay future societal and technological developments. True Artificial Intelligence is another widely anticipated factor. It is anticipated that true artificial intelligence, thinking, feeling machines whose capabilities may exceed organic sophont minds may coalesce over this tech period, the Ultra Period.

Beyond Brilliance[edit]

Technological Period: TL:28-30 & TL:31-33 and Tech-Name: Dei-Tech & Omni-Tech
Common Characteristics: Delegative Rule (AI), Post-Scarcity, Strong nanotech, Emotive ("Dreaming or Feeling machines"), Self-Aware Robots, etc.
Tech Epoch TL-Range Remarks
Transcendent Epoch & Ascendant Epoch TL:28-30 & TL:31-33 COMPUTERS: Even futurists have a hard time guessing what form electronics will take these tech epochs or even whether they will exist at all.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Electronics. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. The text of Wikipedia is available under the Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at law Moore's law. The list of authors can be seen in the law&action=history page history. The text of Wikipedia is available under the Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Fib

Comp-Prog-Dav-R-Deitrick-Starter-Trav-Page-16 16-July-2018a.jpg

Fib indicates the presence of a fiber optic computer, which is better hardened to survive cosmic radiation and combat damage.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

A Ship’s Computer also transmits control impulses for maneuver and jump drives, and conducts the routine operation of all ship systems. What the computer actually does is based on the programs actually installed and operating at any one time. [1]

Selected Ship's Computer Types[edit]

  1. Model/1 Computer
  2. Model/2 Computer
  3. Model/3 Computer
  4. Model/4 Computer
  5. Model/5 Computer
  6. Model/6 Computer
  7. Model/7 Computer
  8. Model/8 Computer
  9. Model/9 Computer

Selected Ship's Computer Modifiers[edit]

  • bis - From the old Terran French word bis, which translates as "again".
    • It is functionally an enhanced computer.
  • fib - A contraction of Fibre Optic Computer.
    • It is functionally a computer protected against EMP or excess radiation.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Ship’s Computers within Charted Space are intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for use under hard vacuum and heavy exposure to cosmic radiation if necessary. [2]

Computer Overview[edit]

One overall computer for the ship must be specified; the basic requirement for this computer is based on the tonnage of the ship. The catalogued computer models indicate the model number, price, tonnage, CPU, and storage minimum ship size, energy point requirement, and tech level. [3]

  • Model number is the relative size of the computer, and corresponds to the computer model numbers in earlier ship catalogues.
  • Prices are given in megacredits.
  • Tonnage is the number of interior tons required for the installation of the computer.
  • CPU and storage capacity are included for use regarding computer programming.
  • Ship size shows the hull tonnage code which requires a certain computer as a minimum. For instance, a 10,000 ton ship has hull code K, and requires at least a Model/4 computer to be installed.
  • Tech level shows the minimum expected tech level required to build the indicated computer.
  • Energy point requirement is the number of energy points which must be committed to powering the computer.

Computer model also indicates the size of the jump which the computer can safely control.[4]

  • A Model/1 computer is required on a ship which makes a Jump-1 trip, a Model/5 computer is required on a ship which makes a Jump-5 trip.
  • Computer models greater than Model/6 do not allow greater jumps, and in any case, the ship would require the appropriate jump drive.
  • The Bis models are capable of controlling a jump one higher than their model numbers. Model/1 bis is capable of controlling a Jump-2 trip.
  • Models bis and fib are often notated with a letter in parentheses after the model number. This letter is the Universal Ship Profile code for the computer. Thus, the USP code for a Model/5 fib is E.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc MillerFrank ChadwickJohn Harshman. High Guard (Game Designers Workshop, 1980), 28.
  4. Marc MillerFrank ChadwickJohn Harshman. High Guard (Game Designers Workshop, 1980), 28.
 

Fiber Optic Computer

Imperial-Sunburst-Sun-Scouts-wiki.png

A Fiber Optic Computer, also notated as Fibre Optic Computer is a specially hardened computer most often used in military ships.

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please see the following AAB Library Data articles for more information:



Description (Specifications)[edit]

It is a computer whose logic circuits are constructed from fibre optic conduits. Such computers are less vulnerable to radiation effects than normal electronic computers and for this reason are often used on military vessels.

Selected Ship's Computer Types[edit]

  1. Model/1 Computer
  2. Model/2 Computer
  3. Model/3 Computer
  4. Model/4 Computer
  5. Model/5 Computer
  6. Model/6 Computer
  7. Model/7 Computer
  8. Model/8 Computer
  9. Model/9 Computer

Selected Ship's Computer Modifiers[edit]

  1. bis
  2. fib
  3. flt

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Hard radiation is a serious problem in deep space, or even with interplanetary space, the stellar system. It wreaks havoc on electronics, especially conventional electronics. Fiber Optic Computers were one of the solutions to minimize damage from radiation in deep space.

Expected Computer Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Fire Control Computer

Wiki Navy.png

A Fire Control Computer is a sophisticated information technology device that coordinates the weapon fire of vehicles and vessels.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

Computer Controls[edit]

Computer Controls: In almost all cases where the ship's computer can control a given ship function (gravity, doors, etc.), orders fed in at the central bridge computer take precedence over those fed in at local controls. Only if the computer is inoperative will a computer override be ineffective.[1] Some ships have been known to be built with a different system set-up, but this arrangement is commonplace on most vessels within Charted Space.[2]

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
 

Flight Computer

Flight Computer
Imperial-Sunburst-Yellow-wiki.png
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–10
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see Ship Computer
TBD

A Flight Computer is a kind of avionics and/or astronics computer used for NAFAL flight.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

It is a lighter computer used on smallcraft, bigcraft, boats, non-starships, aircraft, Spaceplanes, spacecraft, system craft, and smaller craft that do not require the massive computing power needed to make FTL Jump Drive astrogational plotting.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The first widely successful models appear at TL:7-9, although more analog versions primarly using electromechanical technology are possible and even viable at TL:4-6. By TL:10-12 and TL:13-15, advanced flight computers are a given on almost any vehicles capable of leaving the surface including the majority of gravcraft.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Fuzzy Electronics

Fuzzy Electronics
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Technological Overview of Electronics[edit]

Electronics Generations:

  1. Analogue Electronics (TL:4-6)
  2. Macroelectronics (TL:4-6) (Conventional Electronics or Digital Electronics)
  3. Microelectronics (TL:7-9)
  4. Optoelectronics (TL:10-12)
  5. Myelotronics (TL:13-15)
  6. Claytronics (TL:16-18)
  7. Nanotronics (TL:19-21)
  8. Fuzzy Electronics (TL:19-21)
  9. Atomtronics (TL:22-24)
  10. Psychotronics (TL:25-27)

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Generate Program

Comp-Prog-Dav-R-Deitrick-Starter-Trav-Page-16 16-July-2018a.jpg

The Generate Program is designed to create safe jumpspace routes for use by interstellar starships engaging in FTL space travel. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Routine programs are used to operate systems other than weaponry, and without regard to violent interaction.

  • Generate creates a flight plan which will govern the use of the jump program. The navigator or pilot can input specific co-ordinates into the computer concerning a destination, and the generate program will create a flight plan to take the ship there.
  • In cases where a generate program is not available, starports have single-use flight plans (in self-erasing cassettes) available for all worlds within a jump range of six parsecs for Cr10,000 per jump number.
  • The generate program may be used independently and produces the required flight plan, which is then used by the ship’s computer when the jump is performed.

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Routine Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [9]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [10]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [11]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38-39.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  8. Steve DanielsJim McLeanChristopher Thrash. Far Trader (Steve Jackson Games, 1999), 68.
  9. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  10. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  11. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Gunner Program

Ship-Turret-WH-Keith-CT-Starter-Trav-Pg-33 03-July-2018a.jpg

The Gunner Program is designed to achieve accurate fire from shipboard weaponry. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Offensive programs are intended to allow the use of weapons mounted on a ship to damage or destroy enemy vessels. • Gunner interact interfaces the expertise of the gunner in a specific turret to the hit probability of those shipboard weapons hitting the target. • The expertise of the gunner contributes to the accuracy of the shipboard weaponry. • While most systems are designed to work in conjunction with a sophont gunner, experimental completely automated gunnery software is also under development. Such robotic gunnery software may one day change the face of interstellar naval combat. [2]

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Offensive Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [10]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [11]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [12]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  9. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  10. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  11. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  12. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Hand Computer

Hand Computer
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type Tool
Tech Level TL–8
Cost Cr150
Reference TBD
Size 0.2 liters
Weight 0.5 kg
Manufacturer Various
Also see Processor
TBD
Hand Computer
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type Tool
Tech Level TL–11
Cost Cr1000
Reference TBD
Size 0.2 liters
Weight 0.3 Kg
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

The Hand Computer (or handcomp) is a small, powerful multi-function computer that can be used to store and recall basic factual data, perform complex calculations, and control other electronic devices.


Please see the following AAB Library Data articles for more information:


Description (Specifications)[edit]

Hand computers can be optimized for certain fields of knowledge by the use of modular data clips which can be easily inserted and removed (Cr200 each).

The hand computer also serves as a computer terminal when linked to a larger computer (...such as onboard a ship).

Most handcomps run on batteries, which allow use for a year or more, can charge from any power source with the proper adapter, or may incorporate small solar cells to provide all the power they need.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

Data Clips[edit]

Data Clips for particular applications allow characters to use the hand computer to calculate jump parameters, ballistic performance, chemical formulae, etc. The hand computer can be linked to various sensors and allows them to be monitored or controlled from a distance.

Related Terms[edit]

  1. Commcomp
  2. Calculator
  3. Hand Calculator
  4. Handcomp
  5. Wrist Computer

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Technological Overview of Hand Computers[edit]

Epochal Technological Development: Information Technology is at its earliest conceptual state and slowly grows into mechanical calculative devices to early electronics to the first true computers and beyond.

Information Age Societies[edit]

TL:1-3:
COMPUTERS: The abacus and the quipu represent early calculating tech. they are simple, mechanical processors that help a sophont keep large numbers of calculations in memory. Mathematics makes great leaps forward with the development of algebra, trigonometry, and calculus.

TL:4-6:
COMPUTERS: The first analog computers and calculators greatly enhance business and academic endeavors. Mechanical and early electronic calculators become fixtures. Electric devices, polymers, and early electronics fuel continuing progress. Designers use classic Lovelacian programming and aspire to build the first Babbage machines. Many sophont societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/1 and Model/1 bis processors.

TL:7-9:
COMPUTERS: Replacing the Calculator at TL–8 in their original production styles, they are primitive, have limited computational capabilities, and are relatively expensive, starting at around Cr150.

Bright Age Societies[edit]

TL:10-12:
COMPUTERS: They continue to be produced through TL–11. The late TL–11 models are quite capable, with interfaces for GPS systems, laser rangefinders, networking and remote distributed processing capability. They are gradually replaced by more flexible Commcomps.

TL:13-15:
COMPUTERS: High autonomous robots outperform many educated experts across many fields. They still can’t match the apex professors, but they can perform perfectly well at the professional level. Holocrystals and advanced bio-compumetrics are increasing functioning to billions of actions per nanosecond. Computer brain implants allow complete rehabilitation and restoration of function to almost all individuals who were formerly handicapped. Infomorphs and downloadable brains supplement wafertech. Pseudoreality simulators show amazing promise. Many societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/7, Model/8, and Model/9 processors.

TL:16-18:
COMPUTERS: High autonomous robots outperform many educated experts across many fields. They still can’t match the apex professors, but they can perform perfectly well at the professional level. Holocrystals and advanced bio-compumetrics are increasing functioning to billions of actions per nanosecond. Computer brain implants allow complete rehabilitation and restoration of function to almost all individuals who were formerly handicapped. Infomorphs and downloadable brains supplement wafertech. Pseudoreality simulators show amazing promise. Many societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/7, Model/8, and Model/9 processors. Hop Drives begin to use more advanced Ship's Computers.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

 

House Brain

House Brain
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Infomorph

Imperial-Sunburst-Sun-Scouts-wiki.png

An Infomorph is a disembodied intelligence not tied to any particular bodily vessel.

  • Imperial technology requires a storage medium, but some scientists have hypothesized that truly disembodied intelligences may exist within the depths of jumpspace or elsewhere.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Infomorphs are minds or intelligences. Most sophonts have been conditioned to think of them as an inseparable part of a sophont: mind and body. But the universe is strange, and when we think we understand it, it undoubtedly throws us a curve ball. So it is with infomorphs.

Metempsychosis (Mind Transference)[edit]

Metempsychosis is the process by which a mind is transferred from one body, or vessel, to another. The most visible use of metempsychosis is the medical procedure Relict Regeneration, a kind of cloning technology.

Infomorphic Typologies[edit]

There are three main kinds of infomorphs:

  1. Conventional Minds (organic)
  2. Unconventional Minds (inorganic)
  3. Exotic Minds (neither)

Organic Infomorphs[edit]

Organic infomorphs are flesh and blood. The electromagnetic energies occupying their fleshy brains can sometimes be moved from one body to another through the miracle of technology. The Denaar are one such organic sophont species capable of such feats.

Inorganic Infomorphs[edit]

Inorganic infomorphs are most often mineral life, which is to say inorganic in nature. Not flesh and blood. Usually silicon and metals. Most technological computers use similar substrates. Inorganic minds, in many ways, resemble computer programs or positronic brains. The Chips are one such race.

Exotic Infomorphs[edit]

What could an exotic infomorph be composed of? Some have proposed disembodied psionic minds set adrift, or the raw stuff of jumpspace formed into a consciousness. Some have even proposed dark matter minds. Noone really knows.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Sometime around TL-10, many sophont societies develop sophisticated enough computer technologies to begin recording intelligences digitally. The concept of a Infomorph becomes a reality rather than a farfetched fantasy.

The earliest infomorphs were very crude, inaccurate recreations of organic minds. At the same time, artificially created infomorphs also become conceivable. Rumors of "ghosts in the machine" become more widespread, veritable ghost stories of the information age. Today's modern TL-15 infomorphic technology is considerably more sophisticated than those early digitally recorded personalities. True transference of a complete consciousness, however, is still not a perfected science.

Infomorphs, Folktales & Myths[edit]

Many of the low technology worlds of Charted Space treat infomorphs with great apprehension and skepticism. After all, how really different is an infomorph from the ghosts, spirits, and lost souls of yesteryear? Few things can be quite as unsettling as hearing the voice of one's forebears speaking across space and time through the medium of technology...

Infomorphs of Charted Space[edit]

Charted Space is the home of many infomorphs, some that fit the definition to a tee, and others whose infomorphdom is much looser.

Denaar Sophont Species[edit]

The Denaar sophont species is well known for its natural ability to transfer their minds from one Denaar body to another. This process is referred to as Metempsychosis.

Zid Rachele[edit]

Some have claimed that the infamous Vilani terrorist Zid Rachele of the Rachele Society was actually an infomorph planted in a pseudobiological robot frame. Most regard this as an unlikely conspiracy theory.

Clone Tech: Relict Regeneration[edit]

Relict Regeneration is a medical procedure in which the body of an injured sophont is too grievously injured to repair, so a new body is prepared through genetic cloning and the mind of the originating body is transferred to the newly prepared bodily vessel.

The Virus[edit]

The phenomenon of the Virus is not well understood. Some understand it to be a silicone lifeform, a kind of unconventional life, while others believe it to be a purely digital infomorph. Even more outlandish theories have been proposed.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Intelligent Network

Intelligent Network
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Jump Program

Wiki Navy.png

The Jump Program is a miraculous technology designed to work with jump drives and make interstellar society possible. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Routine programs are used to operate systems other than weaponry, and without regard to violent interaction.

  • Jump is required to allow the ship to perform a jump through interstellar space. The specific program for the jump distance required must be used. For example, a Jump-6 ship which is going to perform Jump-3 must use the Jump-3 program.
  • Jump programs calculate millions, billions, or trillions of variable to create a safe path through jumpspace. All astrogators are trained to manually generate these routes, but few asotrgators possess the expertise to manage a quality Generate Program and Jump Program working in conjunction. [2]
  • Calculations are onpy as good as the accuracy of the star charts used and data accuracy is vitala s the locations of thousands of stars, mass objects, nubulae, comets, and other astrographic objects can fundamentally affect jump travel. Under the worst cases, terrible misjumps or even destruction f the starship may occur. As such, starships captains put a high premium on securing quality software. [3]

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Routine Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [11]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [12]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [13]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38-39.
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  9. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  10. Steve DanielsJim McLeanChristopher Thrash. Far Trader (Steve Jackson Games, 1999), 68.
  11. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  12. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  13. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Jupiter Brain

Imperial-Sunburst-Sun-Army-wiki.png

A Jupiter Brain is a kind of artifact, an immense, gas giant-sized super computer with a massive mind.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Jupiter brains have long been a goal of information technology and would be a massive artificial planet filled with computronium and designed to create a massive mind, an artificial thinking matrix capable of unparalleled analysis, calculation, and heuristic projection.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Science fiction has long written about the concept and if current technological projections hold, it may become available during the TL:19-27 technological period.

It would require massive material transmutational capability as naturally occurring computronium, the hypothetical perfect memory storage matrix, doesn't naturally exist in the projected quantities required for this megaproject. Much like Dyson Spheres, it is a thought experiment far out of reach of TL:13-15 Charted Space.

Expected Artificial Intelligence Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Matrioshka_brain. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. The text of Wikipedia is available under the Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Superintelligence. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. The text of Wikipedia is available under the Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Launch Program

Ship-Turret-WH-Keith-CT-Starter-Trav-Pg-33 03-July-2018a.jpg

The Launch Program is designed to fire guided missiles. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Offensive programs are intended to allow the use of weapons mounted on a ship to damage or destroy enemy vessels.

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Offensive Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [9]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [10]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [11]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  9. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  10. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  11. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Library Data

Computer-CT-Liz-Danforth-Traveller-Book-pg-70 19-August-2019b.jpg

Library Data is information obtainable from any ship's computer (or starport library) in response to the correct keywords. Only the specific information requested can be accessed by users; most data bases will not reveal additional data or allow indiscriminate browsing through the library records. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Most interstellar ships match up communications to a mainworld when jumping into a system and upload library data files in the same manner as earlier civilizations exchanged newspapers, town criers, or other news sources.

  • Library data files are intentionally designed to be able to be uploaded in a variety of data formats.
  • The files may be transmitted via anything from TL-4 Radio signals, all the way up to TL-15 Tachyon Communicators, improved laser comms, or LIDAR communications devices.
  • Due to the speed of communications being limited to the speed of travel, many versions of a file will often circulated Charted Space. Even information on the same topic, may differ greatly from one end of space to the other.
  • Some library data files haven't been updated in centuries. It isn't unheard of for library data files from the First Imperium to still be in use.

Library Update Program[edit]

The library update program available at any class A or B starport contains a wide variety of information. A shipowner may purchase the program for Cr10,000; local ships carrying passengers for hire will already have it. Any crew person with access to a computer console (and the program) can request information on a specific subject by specifying a keyword or phrase. [2]

Imperial Library Entry on Library Data[edit]

"Library Data" is a general term used to describe the information available from a typical ship’s computer using its Library Program. In the past, library data had as its source a vast communication network paralleling that of the X-boat system that once operated throughout the united Imperium. An entire series of “hubs” amassed and organized vast quantities of data and send it out to each other. At each hub the entire collection of information could be compiled and redistributed to private customers, including starships, hotels, universities, fixed-location libraries, and hand computer services.

In the Divided Imperium, library data services have diminished much as the X-boat routes have. In various areas, reliable service can still be found-sometimes taken over by a commercial firm, sometimes taken over by a local governmental body. The farther that a message or data must travel, however, the more tenuous is its consistency. And X-boat messages have difficulty travelling across borders or are sometimes lost to marauding pirates. Library data likewise is sporadic and intermittent in its arrival, which causes much of its information to have lost its up to-the-minute flavor.

In addition, the library data “network” (pretending for the moment that the system still exists as intact as it once was) has lost contact with many of its original sources of data researchers, historians, and journalists often fail nowadays to submit timely reports of their discoveries. Embarrassing gaps exist in many library data entries today, and severe over-generalization has resulted in misinformation occasionally being published as apparent fact. [3]

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Many restricted library data files require high level clearances to access. Many suspect that various polities manipulate the files, greatly censoring and controlling information.

SMART (Spinward Marches Archive Retrieval Team)[edit]

One of the areas of the Imperium that was first to lose its accurate library data was the area “behind the claw,” Trojan Reach, the Spinward Marches, and Deneb, but thanks to the quick action of Archduke Norris of Deneb, the library data service for the region was reestablished and made as accurate and efficient as it had been under the united Imperium.

SMART, the Spinward Marches Archive Retrieval Team, was selected from historians working at the region’s colleges and universities Under the direction of Eura Regnis of the Regina Center for Research, the team set to work in 1117 to restore library data service throughout the archduke's domain. Norris’s mandate for this group's work has been instrumental in insuring that the Imperium, once reunited, will be able to build upon the scientific and historical legacy of its predecessors.

Regnis and her colleagues accomplished their task in only two short years, and in 1119, SMART Library Data, LIC opened its doors as a semiprivate company, guided by a board appointed by the archduke. The library data in this book was generated by one of the SMART system's computers; it was automatically summarized to provide the highlights of a number of interesting topics.

Within this summary, the reader can find historical information on the Third Imperium and the events that led up to the divided Imperium today Information on all the major races of the Imperium and its surrounding environs is also here, complete with updates of alien activities since Strephon's untimely death. The most important minor races are summarized in this volume, too.

Several in-depth summary supplements round out the information here, giving background information on the united Imperium, its worlds, its emperors, and its nobility; the megacorporations and major merchant lines doing business in the Imperium, the activities and organization of the Imperial Interstellar Scout Service; and a special report on recent military technology and its use by the Imperial Navy in reuniting our worlds and punishing the usurper Dulinor.

While the SMART library data is as complete as humanly possible, it must be understood that a number of mitigating circumstances have interfered with this collection. Since the revolt of Vland Sector and its neighbors, the SMART researchers were unable to establish a reliable communications link between the Spinward Marches and some of the larger fixed libraries, such as the AAB on Vland and the Imperial Library on Capital. Despite this incapability, SMART Library Data is proud of the successes it has had in producing a work that should help all loyal Imperial citizens strive toward the establishment of the united Imperium and the coronation of its rightful Emperor. [4]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Marc Miller. Twilight's Peak (Game Designers Workshop, 1980), 41.
  2. Marc Miller. The Kinunir (Game Designers Workshop, 1979), 1-2.
  3. Marc Miller. Imperial Encyclopedia (Game Designers Workshop, 1987), 16.
  4. Marc Miller. Imperial Encyclopedia (Game Designers Workshop, 1987), 16.
 

Library Program

Wiki Navy.png

The Library Program or Library Update Program is designed to provide Library Data, a vital source of information within the boundaries of Charted Space]], a vast area. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Routine programs are used to operate systems other than weaponry, and without regard to violent interaction.

  • Library Data is an encyclopedic compendium of information concerning the local stellar region. Crew and passengers often refer to this program before disembarking on a world.
  • Wise starship captains understand that the library program is not all inclusive, and may be incorrect in some facts. [2]

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Routine Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [10]

Software Data[edit]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [11]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [12]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38-39.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  9. Steve DanielsJim McLeanChristopher Thrash. Far Trader (Steve Jackson Games, 1999), 68.
  10. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  11. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  12. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Maneuver Program

Wiki Navy.png

The Maneuver Program is designed to facilitate interplanetary or intra-star system travel (NAFAL or STL), and not jump travel. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Routine programs are used to operate systems other than weaponry, and without regard to violent interaction.

  • Maneuver is required to allow the use of maneuver drive.
  • In combat it is often replaced by the maneuver/evade program.
  • It can calculate shorter NAFAL trips within a system including burn durations, projected fuel usage, and other factors. It can make similar calculations for more advanced non-reaction maneauver drives. [2]

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Routine Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [10]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [11]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [12]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38-39.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  9. Steve DanielsJim McLeanChristopher Thrash. Far Trader (Steve Jackson Games, 1999), 68.
  10. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  11. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  12. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Maneuver/Evade Program

Wiki Navy.png

The Maneuver/Evade Program is designed to allow a ship to use evasive maneauver to avoid enemy weapon fire. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Defensive programs are used to protect a starship against enemy action.

  • Maneuver/evade is a series of six programs which automatically produce minor movement for a ship, thus reducing the chances of the ship being hit by laser fire. Each has a DM based on pilot expertise (take the fraction of pilot skill and drop any fractions). In addition, these programs allow the use of the maneuver drive as required, in lieu of the normal maneuver program.
  • The Auto/Evade Program performs a similar function, and is generally considered less effective. [2]

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Defensive Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [8]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [9]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [10]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  9. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  10. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Map Box

Map Box
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type Computer
Tech Level TL–11
Cost Cr2500
Reference TBD
Size 1.0 liter
Weight 1.0 kg
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

The Map Box is a compact (250 x 250 x 10mm, which expand to 1000 x 1000 x 10mm when opened) display system for computerized maps of a world.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Scale may be adjusted. Most inhabited planets have MapClips (diskettes until TL–13, holocrystals at higher levels) available for Cr150.

When not available, two orbital sweeps of the world are required to obtain the necessary photographs to construct a map chip. Blank MapClips are available for Cr30.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Master Fire Director

Imperial-Sunburst-Yellow-wiki.png

A Master Fire Director or MFD is a starship weapons control system, consisting of an independent and dedicated sensor system, an optional missile control communications system, linked to single control system.

  • This allows an operator to operate several independent weapons from the same console and linked for effect.
  • It is a kind of Ship Equipment.

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please see the following AAB Library Data articles for more information:


Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Matrioshka Mind

Imperial-Sunburst-Sun-Scouts-wiki.png

No information or synopsis yet available.

  • It is a kind of artifact, an immense, star-sized super computer with a massive mind.
  • A similar concept is known as a Jupiter Brain among other terms.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Expected Artificial Intelligence Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Meta Identity

Imperial-Sunburst-Sun-Scouts-wiki.png

A Meta Identity is a consciousness which is able to move itself from one body to the next while retaining the same identity.

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please refer to the following AAB Library Data for more information:

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Microelectronics

Microelectronics
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Technological Overview of Electronics[edit]

Electronics Generations:

  1. Analogue Electronics (TL:4-6)
  2. Macroelectronics (TL:4-6) (Conventional Electronics or Digital Electronics)
  3. Microelectronics (TL:7-9)
  4. Optoelectronics (TL:10-12)
  5. Myelotronics (TL:13-15)
  6. Claytronics (TL:16-18)
  7. Nanotronics (TL:19-21)
  8. Fuzzy Electronics (TL:19-21)
  9. Atomtronics (TL:22-24)
  10. Psychotronics (TL:25-27)

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Mind

Computer-CT-Liz-Danforth-Traveller-Book-pg-70 19-August-2019b.jpg

A Mind is a sophisticated computer technology with very intelligent programming that is near true artificial intelligence level.

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please see the following AAB Library Data articles for more information:



Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

Brains, Minds & Personalities[edit]

Very advanced computers begin to develop various types of autonomous programming and are referred to with other specialized terms:

Brains, Minds & Personalities
Term Remarks
Brain A Brain is a sophisticated Bright Age Information Technology computer without a significant personality. [1]
Mind A Mind is a sophisticated Bright Age Information Technology computer with a significant personality. [2]
Personality A Personality is a Bright to Brilliant Age feature of sophisticated computers capable of high levels of autonomous thought and independent decision-making. [3]

NOTES: the differences between a brain and a mind are very negligible. There is significant overlap between the definitions, both formally and informally. As a generality, brains are lower performance and minds are higher performance. Brains were first operated without personalities. Later models began to include lower quality personalities. All minds are designed from the onset to include high quality personalities.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Expected Artificial Intelligence Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Marc Miller. "Computers, Consoles, and Controllers." T5 Core Rules (2013): 515-519.
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc Miller. "Personalities and Brains." T5 Core Rules (2013): 522-525.
 

Mind Control Technology

Wiki Navy.png

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Model/1 Computer

Imperial-Sunburst-Yellow-wiki.png

A Model/1 Computer is a sophisticated electronic computer.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

A basic model of Ship's Computer. It runs complex programs that control shipboard functions such as interstellar jumps and in-system astrogation.

  • A Model/1 computer using a Navigation Program is capable of initiating a Jump-1.
  • It runs multiple background applications including anti virus software, entertainment programs, and routine communications. It maintains passive security programs and monitors life support systems.

Operators are able to interact with the computer via Control Panels and Control Consoles.

Standard Variants[edit]

A number of different versions of the Model/1 are available:

Model/1[edit]

The base model of the -/1 series.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/1
2. Cost: MCr2
3. Size: 1 Ton
4. Capacity: 2 CPU / 4 Storage
5. Tonnage: 999 Tons Maximum
6. TL: TL-5
7. Power: 0 EP

Model/1fib[edit]

A Model/1fib is a Fiber Optic Computer, a hardened and shielded version that has a fiber optic back-up system to resist radiation damage.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/1fib
Model/A
2. Cost: MCr3
3. Size: 2 Tons
4. Capacity: 2 CPU / 4 Storage
5. Tonnage: 999 Tons Maximum
6. TL: TL-5
7. Power: 0 EP

Model/1bis[edit]

A Model/1bis computer is an improved version of the standard Model/1 with greater program handling capability at the expense of storage.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/1bis
Model/R
2. Cost: MCr4
3. Size: 1 Ton
4. Capacity: 4 CPU / 0 Storage
5. Tonnage: 999 Tons Maximum
6. TL: TL-6
7. Power: 0 EP

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The Command Section of a vessel typically includes a designated Computer Officer.

A Ship's Computer is routinely linked to Anti-hijack Programs.

  • Anti-hijack procedures protect the ship against potential takeovers. The program constantly monitors conditions within the vessel via onboard sensors. If a hijack situation occurs, it automatically locks access doors to the bridge and engineering sections and shuts down control consoles and control panels

Computers of this type may also be found running planetary infrastructure elements, military and COACC facilities, and industrial sites such as automated factories.

Old models of computer can generally be traded in at 25% of their original cost.

Computer Control Standards[edit]

Computer Controls: In almost all cases where the Ship's Computer can control a given ship function (gravity, doors, sensors etc.), orders fed in at the central bridge computer take precedence over those fed in at local controls. Only if the computer is inoperative will a computer override be ineffective.[1] Some ships have been known to be built with a different system set-up, but this arrangement is commonplace on most vessels within Charted Space. [2]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
 

Model/2 Computer

Imperial-Sunburst-Yellow-wiki.png

A Model/2 Computer is a sophisticated electronic computer.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

A relatively basic model of Ship's Computer. It runs complex programs that control shipboard functions such as interstellar jumps and in-system astrogation.

  • A Model/2 computer using a Navigation Program is capable of initiating up to a Jump-2.
  • It runs multiple background applications including anti virus software, entertainment programs, and routine communications. It maintains passive security programs and monitors life support systems.

Operators are able to interact with the computer via Control Panels and Control Consoles.

Standard Variants[edit]

A number of different versions of the Model/2 are available:

Model/2[edit]

The base model of the -/2 series.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/2
2. Cost: MCr9
3. Size: 2 Tons
4. Capacity: 3 CPU / 6 Storage
5. Tonnage: 3,999 Tons Maximum
6. TL: TL-7
7. Power: 0 EP

Model/2fib[edit]

A Model/2fib is a Fiber Optic Computer, a hardened and shielded version that has a fiber optic back-up system to resist radiation damage.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/2fib
Model/B
2. Cost: MCr14
3. Size: 4 Tons
4. Capacity: 3 CPU / 6 Storage
5. Tonnage: 3,999 Tons Maximum
6. TL: TL-7
7. Power: 0 EP

Model/2bis[edit]

A Model/2bis computer is an improved version of the standard Model/2 with greater program handling capability at the expense of storage.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/2bis
Model/S
2. Cost: MCr18
3. Size: 2 Tons
4. Capacity: 6 CPU / 0 Storage
5. Tonnage: 3,999 Tons Maximum
6. TL: TL-8
7. Power: 0 EP

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The Command Section of a vessel typically includes a designated Computer Officer.

A Ship's Computer is routinely linked to Anti-hijack Programs.

  • Anti-hijack procedures protect the ship against potential takeovers. The program constantly monitors conditions within the vessel via onboard sensors. If a hijack situation occurs, it automatically locks access doors to the bridge and engineering sections and shuts down control consoles and control panels

Computers of this type may also be found running planetary infrastructure elements, military and COACC facilities, and industrial sites such as automated factories.

Old models of computer can generally be traded in at 25% of their original cost.

Computer Control Standards[edit]

Computer Controls: In almost all cases where the Ship's Computer can control a given ship function (gravity, doors, sensors etc.), orders fed in at the central bridge computer take precedence over those fed in at local controls. Only if the computer is inoperative will a computer override be ineffective.[1] Some ships have been known to be built with a different system set-up, but this arrangement is commonplace on most vessels within Charted Space. [2]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
 

Model/3 Computer

Imperial-Sunburst-Yellow-wiki.png

A Model/3 Computer is a sophisticated electronic computer.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

A common model of Ship's Computer. It runs complex programs that control shipboard functions such as interstellar jumps and in-system astrogation.

  • A Model/3 computer using a Navigation Program is capable of initiating up to a Jump-3.
  • It runs multiple background applications including anti virus software, entertainment programs, and routine communications. It maintains passive security programs and monitors life support systems.

Operators are able to interact with the computer via Control Consoles.

Standard Variants[edit]

A number of different versions of the Model/3 are available:

Model/3[edit]

The base model of the -/3 series.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/3
2. Cost: MCr18
3. Size: 3 Tons
4. Capacity: 5 CPU / 9 Storage
5. Tonnage: 9,999 Tons Maximum
6. TL: TL-9
7. Power: 1 EP

Model/3fib[edit]

A Model/3fib is a Fiber Optic Computer, a hardened and shielded version that has a fiber optic back-up system to resist radiation damage.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/3fib
Model/C
2. Cost: MCr27
3. Size: 6 Tons
4. Capacity: 5 CPU / 9 Storage
5. Tonnage: 9,999 Tons Maximum
6. TL: TL-9
7. Power: 1 EP

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The Command Section of a spacecraft typically includes a computer officer.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The Command Section of a vessel typically includes a designated Computer Officer.

A Ship's Computer is routinely linked to Anti-hijack Programs.

  • Anti-hijack procedures protect the ship against potential takeovers. The program constantly monitors conditions within the vessel via onboard sensors. If a hijack situation occurs, it automatically locks access doors to the bridge and engineering sections and shuts down control consoles and control panels

Computers of this type may also be found running starports, planetary infrastructure elements, military and COACC facilities, and industrial sites such as automated factories.

Old models of computer can generally be traded in at 25% of their original cost.

Computer Control Standards[edit]

Computer Controls: In almost all cases where the Ship's Computer can control a given ship function (gravity, doors, sensors etc.), orders fed in at the central bridge computer take precedence over those fed in at local controls. Only if the computer is inoperative will a computer override be ineffective.[1] Some ships have been known to be built with a different system set-up, but this arrangement is commonplace on most vessels within Charted Space. [2]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
 

Model/4 Computer

Imperial-Sunburst-Yellow-wiki.png

A Model/4 Computer is a sophisticated electronic computer.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

A common model of Ship's Computer. It runs complex programs that control shipboard functions such as interstellar jumps and in-system astrogation.

  • A Model/4 computer using a Navigation Program is capable of initiating up to a Jump-4.
  • It runs multiple background applications including anti virus software, entertainment programs, and routine communications. It maintains passive security programs and monitors life support systems.

Operators are able to interact with the computer via Control Consoles.

Standard Variants[edit]

A number of different versions of the Model/4 are available:

Model/4[edit]

The base model of the -/4 series.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/4
2. Cost: MCr30
3. Size: 4 Tons
4. Capacity: 8 CPU / 15 Storage
5. Tonnage: 49,999 Tons Maximum
6. TL: TL-10
7. Power: 2 EP

Model/4fib[edit]

A Model/4fib is a Fiber Optic Computer, a hardened and shielded version that has a fiber optic back-up system to resist radiation damage.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/4fib
Model/D
2. Cost: MCr45
3. Size: 8 Tons
4. Capacity: 8 CPU / 15 Storage
5. Tonnage: 49,999 Tons Maximum
6. TL: TL-10
7. Power: 2 EP

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The Command Section of a vessel typically includes a designated Computer Officer.

A Ship's Computer is routinely linked to Anti-hijack Programs.

  • Anti-hijack procedures protect the ship against potential takeovers. The program constantly monitors conditions within the vessel via onboard sensors. If a hijack situation occurs, it automatically locks access doors to the bridge and engineering sections and shuts down control consoles and control panels

Computers of this type may also be found running starports, planetary infrastructure elements, military and COACC facilities, and industrial sites such as automated factories.

Old models of computer can generally be traded in at 25% of their original cost.

Computer Control Standards[edit]

Computer Controls: In almost all cases where the Ship's Computer can control a given ship function (gravity, doors, sensors etc.), orders fed in at the central bridge computer take precedence over those fed in at local controls. Only if the computer is inoperative will a computer override be ineffective.[1] Some ships have been known to be built with a different system set-up, but this arrangement is commonplace on most vessels within Charted Space. [2]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
 

Model/5 Computer

Imperial-Sunburst-Yellow-wiki.png

A Model/5 Computer is a sophisticated electronic computer.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

A common model of Ship's Computer. It runs complex programs that control shipboard functions such as interstellar jumps and in-system astrogation.

  • A Model/5 computer using a Navigation Program is capable of initiating up to a Jump-5.
  • It runs multiple background applications including anti virus software, entertainment programs, and routine communications. It maintains passive security programs and monitors life support systems.

Operators are able to interact with the computer via Control Consoles.

Standard Variants[edit]

A number of different versions of the Model/5 are available:

Model/5[edit]

The base model of the -/5 series.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/5
2. Cost: MCr45
3. Size: 5 Tons
4. Capacity: 12 CPU / 25 Storage
5. Tonnage: 99,999 Tons Maximum
6. TL: TL-11
7. Power: 3 EP

Model/5fib[edit]

A Model/5fib is a Fiber Optic Computer, a hardened and shielded version that has a fiber optic back-up system to resist radiation damage.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/5fib
Model/E
2. Cost: MCr68
3. Size: 10 Tons
4. Capacity: 12 CPU / 25 Storage
5. Tonnage: 99,999 Tons Maximum
6. TL: TL-11
7. Power: 3 EP

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The Command Section of a vessel typically includes a designated Computer Officer.

A Ship's Computer is routinely linked to Anti-hijack Programs.

  • Anti-hijack procedures protect the ship against potential takeovers. The program constantly monitors conditions within the vessel via onboard sensors. If a hijack situation occurs, it automatically locks access doors to the bridge and engineering sections and shuts down control consoles and control panels

Computers of this type may also be found running starports, planetary infrastructure elements, military and COACC facilities, and industrial sites such as automated factories.

Old models of computer can generally be traded in at 25% of their original cost.

Computer Control Standards[edit]

Computer Controls: In almost all cases where the Ship's Computer can control a given ship function (gravity, doors, sensors etc.), orders fed in at the central bridge computer take precedence over those fed in at local controls. Only if the computer is inoperative will a computer override be ineffective.[1] Some ships have been known to be built with a different system set-up, but this arrangement is commonplace on most vessels within Charted Space. [2]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
 

Model/6 Computer

Imperial-Sunburst-Yellow-wiki.png

A Model/6 Computer is a sophisticated electronic computer.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

A sophisticated model of Ship's Computer. It runs complex programs that control shipboard functions such as interstellar jumps and in-system astrogation.

  • A Model/6 computer using a Navigation Program is capable of initiating any level of Jump.
  • It runs multiple background applications including anti virus software, entertainment programs, and routine communications. It maintains passive security programs and monitors life support systems.

Control Interfaces[edit]

Operators are able to interact with the computer via Control Consoles.

Standard Variants[edit]

A number of different versions of the Model/6 are available:

Model/6[edit]

The base model of the -/6 series.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/6
2. Cost: MCr55
3. Size: 7 Tons
4. Capacity: 15 CPU / 35 Storage
5. Tonnage: 999,999 Tons Maximum
6. TL: TL-12
7. Power: 5 EP

Model/6fib[edit]

A Model/6fib is a Fiber Optic Computer, a hardened and shielded version that has a fiber optic back-up system to resist radiation damage.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/6fib
Model/F
2. Cost: MCr83
3. Size: 14 Tons
4. Capacity: 15 CPU / 35 Storage
5. Tonnage: 999,999 Tons Maximum
6. TL: TL-12
7. Power: 5 EP

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The Command Section of a vessel typically includes a designated Computer Officer.

  • Computers of this type may also be found running starports, planetary infrastructure elements, military and COACC facilities, and industrial sites such as automated factories.
  • Old models of computer can generally be traded in at 25% of their original cost.

Anti-hijack Programs[edit]

A Ship's Computer is routinely linked to Anti-hijack Programs.

  • Anti-hijack procedures protect the ship against potential takeovers. The program constantly monitors conditions within the vessel via onboard sensors. If a hijack situation occurs, it automatically locks access doors to the bridge and engineering sections and shuts down control consoles and control panels

Computer Control Standards[edit]

Computer Controls: In almost all cases where the Ship's Computer can control a given ship function (gravity, doors, sensors etc.), orders fed in at the central bridge computer take precedence over those fed in at local controls. Only if the computer is inoperative will a computer override be ineffective.[1] Some ships have been known to be built with a different system set-up, but this arrangement is commonplace on most vessels within Charted Space. [2]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
 

Model/7 Computer

Imperial-Sunburst-Yellow-wiki.png

A Model/7 Computer is a sophisticated electronic computer.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

A sophisticated model of Ship's Computer. It runs complex programs that control shipboard functions such as interstellar jumps and in-system astrogation.

  • A Model/7 computer using a Navigation Program is capable of initiating any level of Jump.
  • It runs multiple background applications including anti virus software, entertainment programs, and routine communications. It maintains passive security programs and monitors life support systems.

Operators are able to interact with the computer via Control Consoles.

Standard Variants[edit]

A number of different versions of the Model/7 are available:

Model/7[edit]

The base model of the -/7 series.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/7
2. Cost: MCr80
3. Size: 9 Tons
4. Capacity: 20 CPU / 50 Storage
5. Tonnage: Unlimited
6. TL: TL-13
7. Power: 7 EP

Model/7fib[edit]

A Model/7fib is a Fiber Optic Computer, a hardened and shielded version that has a fiber optic back-up system to resist radiation damage.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/7fib
Model/G
2. Cost: MCr100
3. Size: 18 Tons
4. Capacity: 20 CPU / 50 Storage
5. Tonnage: Unlimited
6. TL: TL-13
7. Power: 7 EP

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The Command Section of a vessel typically includes a designated Computer Officer.

A Ship's Computer is routinely linked to Anti-hijack Programs.

  • Anti-hijack procedures protect the ship against potential takeovers. The program constantly monitors conditions within the vessel via onboard sensors. If a hijack situation occurs, it automatically locks access doors to the bridge and engineering sections and shuts down control consoles and control panels

Computers of this type may also be found running starports, planetary infrastructure elements, military and COACC facilities, or within research institutes, universities, and advanced industrial facilities.

Old models of computer can generally be traded in at 25% of their original cost.

Computer Control Standards[edit]

Computer Controls: In almost all cases where the Ship's Computer can control a given ship function (gravity, doors, sensors etc.), orders fed in at the central bridge computer take precedence over those fed in at local controls. Only if the computer is inoperative will a computer override be ineffective.[1] Some ships have been known to be built with a different system set-up, but this arrangement is commonplace on most vessels within Charted Space. [2]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
 

Model/8 Computer

Imperial-Sunburst-Yellow-wiki.png

A Model/8 Computer is a sophisticated electronic computer.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

A sophisticated model of Ship's Computer. It runs complex programs that control shipboard functions such as interstellar jumps and in-system astrogation.

  • A Model/8 computer using a Navigation Program is capable of initiating any level of Jump.
  • It runs multiple background applications including anti virus software, entertainment programs, and routine communications. It maintains passive security programs and monitors life support systems.

Operators are able to interact with the computer via Control Consoles.

Standard Variants[edit]

A number of different versions of the Model/8 are available:

Model/8[edit]

The base model of the -/8 series.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/8
2. Cost: MCr110
3. Size: 11 Tons
4. Capacity: 30 CPU / 70 Storage
5. Tonnage: Unlimited
6. TL: TL-14
7. Power: 9 EP

Model/8fib[edit]

A Model/8fib is a Fiber Optic Computer, a hardened and shielded version that has a fiber optic back-up system to resist radiation damage.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/8fib
Model/H
2. Cost: MCr140
3. Size: 18 Tons
4. Capacity: 30 CPU / 70 Storage
5. Tonnage: Unlimited
6. TL: TL-14
7. Power: 9 EP

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The Command Section of a vessel typically includes a designated Computer Officer.

A Ship's Computer is routinely linked to Anti-hijack Programs.

  • Anti-hijack procedures protect the ship against potential takeovers. The program constantly monitors conditions within the vessel via onboard sensors. If a hijack situation occurs, it automatically locks access doors to the bridge and engineering sections and shuts down control consoles and control panels

Computers of this type may also be found running starports, planetary infrastructure elements, military and COACC facilities, or within research institutes, universities, and advanced industrial facilities.

Old models of computer can generally be traded in at 25% of their original cost.

Computer Control Standards[edit]

Computer Controls: In almost all cases where the Ship's Computer can control a given ship function (gravity, doors, sensors etc.), orders fed in at the central bridge computer take precedence over those fed in at local controls. Only if the computer is inoperative will a computer override be ineffective.[1] Some ships have been known to be built with a different system set-up, but this arrangement is commonplace on most vessels within Charted Space. [2]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
 

Model/9 Computer

Imperial-Sunburst-Yellow-wiki.png

A Model/9 Computer is a sophisticated electronic computer.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

An advanced model of Ship's Computer. It runs complex programs that control shipboard functions such as interstellar jumps and in-system astrogation.

  • A Model/9 computer using a Navigation Program is capable of initiating any level of Jump.
  • It runs multiple background applications including anti virus software, entertainment programs, and routine communications. It maintains passive security programs and monitors life support systems.

Operators are able to interact with the computer via Control Consoles.

Standard Variants[edit]

A number of different versions of the Model/9 are available:

Model/9[edit]

The base model of the -/9 series.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/9
2. Cost: MCr140
3. Size: 13 Tons
4. Capacity: 40 CPU / 90 Storage
5. Tonnage: Unlimited
6. TL: TL-15
7. Power: 12 EP

Model/9 fib[edit]

A Model/9 fib is a Fiber Optic Computer, a hardened and shielded version that has a fiber optic back-up system to resist radiation damage.

No. Category Remarks
1. Designation: Model/9 fib
Model/J
2. Cost: MCr200
3. Size: 26 Tons
4. Capacity: 40 CPU / 90 Storage
5. Tonnage: Unlimited
6. TL: TL-15
7. Power: 12 EPs

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The Command Section of a vessel typically includes a designated Computer Officer.

A Ship's Computer is routinely linked to Anti-hijack Programs.

  • Anti-hijack procedures protect the ship against potential takeovers. The program constantly monitors conditions within the vessel via onboard sensors. If a hijack situation occurs, it automatically locks access doors to the bridge and engineering sections and shuts down control consoles and control panels

Computers of this type may also be found running starports, planetary infrastructure elements, military and COACC facilities, or within research institutes, universities, and advanced industrial facilities.

Older models of a computer can generally be traded in at 25% of their original cost.

Computer Control Standards[edit]

Computer Controls: In almost all cases where the Ship's Computer can control a given ship function (gravity, doors, sensors etc.), orders fed in at the central bridge computer take precedence over those fed in at local controls. Only if the computer is inoperative will a computer override be ineffective.[1] Some ships have been known to be built with a different system set-up, but this arrangement is commonplace on most vessels within Charted Space. [2]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
 

Multi-target Program

Target-Program-WH-Keith-CT-Starter-Trav-Pg-40 03-July-2018a.jpg

The Multi-target Program is designed to allow complex firing solutions from shipboard weaponry against multiple targets. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Offensive programs are intended to allow the use of weapons mounted on a ship to damage or destroy enemy vessels.

  • Multi-target is a series of programs that interface the ship's detectors and radar with several turrets and allows an attack on more than one target at one time. Each turret may still only fire at one specific target, but different turrets may fire at different targets.
  • This program is required if more than one ship target is fired on in the same phase. The target program is also required.

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Offensive Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [9]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [10]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [11]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  9. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  10. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  11. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Myelotronics

Myelotronics
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Technological Overview of Electronics[edit]

Electronics Generations:

  1. Analogue Electronics (TL:4-6)
  2. Macroelectronics (TL:4-6) (Conventional Electronics or Digital Electronics)
  3. Microelectronics (TL:7-9)
  4. Optoelectronics (TL:10-12)
  5. Myelotronics (TL:13-15)
  6. Claytronics (TL:16-18)
  7. Nanotronics (TL:19-21)
  8. Fuzzy Electronics (TL:19-21)
  9. Atomtronics (TL:22-24)
  10. Psychotronics (TL:25-27)

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Nanotronics

Nanotronics
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Technological Overview of Electronics[edit]

Electronics Generations:

  1. Analogue Electronics (TL:4-6)
  2. Macroelectronics (TL:4-6) (Conventional Electronics or Digital Electronics)
  3. Microelectronics (TL:7-9)
  4. Optoelectronics (TL:10-12)
  5. Myelotronics (TL:13-15)
  6. Claytronics (TL:16-18)
  7. Nanotronics (TL:19-21)
  8. Fuzzy Electronics (TL:19-21)
  9. Atomtronics (TL:22-24)
  10. Psychotronics (TL:25-27)

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Navigation Program

Comp-Prog-Dav-R-Deitrick-Starter-Trav-Page-16 16-July-2018a.jpg

The Navigation Program is designed to safely and successfully travel through the vast mysteries of jump space. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Routine programs are used to operate systems other than weaponry, and without regard to violent interaction.

  • Navigation controls the jump process after a flight plan has been produced. Flight plans must be fed into the navigation program, which then interfaces with the jump program to actually take a ship to its destination.
  • To actually make a jump, both the jump and navigation programs must be functioning in the ship’s computer (…the generate program need only run long enough to actually create the flight plan).
  • While the TL-15 societies of Charted Space successfully use FTL travel on a daily basis, true understanding of jumpspace is extremely limited as almost any astrophyscists can tell you. [2]

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Routine Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [10]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [11]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [12]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38-39.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  9. Steve DanielsJim McLeanChristopher Thrash. Far Trader (Steve Jackson Games, 1999), 68.
  10. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  11. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  12. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Neural Net

Neural Net
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Optoelectronics

Optoelectronics
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Technological Overview of Electronics[edit]

Electronics Generations:

  1. Analogue Electronics (TL:4-6)
  2. Macroelectronics (TL:4-6) (Conventional Electronics or Digital Electronics)
  3. Microelectronics (TL:7-9)
  4. Optoelectronics (TL:10-12)
  5. Myelotronics (TL:13-15)
  6. Claytronics (TL:16-18)
  7. Nanotronics (TL:19-21)
  8. Fuzzy Electronics (TL:19-21)
  9. Atomtronics (TL:22-24)
  10. Psychotronics (TL:25-27)

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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PRIS Binoculars

PRIS Binoculars
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type Sensory Aid
Tech Level TL–12
Cost Cr3,500
Reference TBD
Size 3.0 liters
Weight 2.0 kg
Manufacturer Various
Also see Gear
TBD
PRIS Binoculars are a Sensory Aid.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

They are the Scout Service's Portable Radiation Imaging System (or PRIS) is still anachronistically called "field glasses" by most Scouts, but the PRIS has many more capabilities than the old style binoculars.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

Functional Explication[edit]

The PRIS can be set to observe images in the spectral range from infrared to gamma rays. The front surface of the PRIS is transparent to all radiation; just behind it is a series of lenses tailored to various specific bands.

A tight beam laser range finder gives an accurate reading on the target within sight up to about 20km, depending upon conditions. The range is displayed as a digital readout in the viewfinder. The PRIS also has a built-in clock and limited memory, so that it can determine the velocity of the object being viewed by comparing its distance from the observer over time.

The unit can be calibrated to a standard self-precessing gyrocompass, in which case the bearing of the direction viewed will be digitally displayed in the corner of the viewfinder.

It also has a standard data port, allowing capture of the viewfinder as digital images on a standard hand-comp or other data storage system.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The magnification strength of the PRIS is adjustable up to 225x. A built-in flywheel for gyroscopic stabilization insures a steady field of view at all magnifications.

Besides its obvious used in the field, the PRIS also finds itself used in a variety of industrial and engineering applications. Its infrared images can be color coded to show the ambient temperatures of objects in the viewfinder. A PRIS can therefore be found near every jump drive, to be used by the engineers looking for "hot spots" on the drive housing. In other areas of the ship, the PRIS can detect problems in electrical circuits, again by finding an area of higher temperature.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Parallel Research Network

Wiki Navy.png

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Passive Exploratory Canary

Passive Exploratory Canary
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type Sensory Aid
Tech Level TL–10
Cost KCr50
Reference TBD
Size 50.0 liters
Weight 50.0 kg
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

A Passive Exploratory Canary is a Virus detection device, used for scanning existing computer systems to determine if they are infected.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Like a Warning Canary, the passive canary consists of a high-speed computer with a number of faked attached controls specifically designed to attract Virus infections. It also includes a set of sensors designed to detect the changes caused by a virus infection.

To use one requires attaching it to an active computer system and waiting to see when (or if) the Virus tries to invade it. While the canary is very reliable at detecting Virus invasions, the longer lived Virus strains have learned to be wary of Canaries and may not attempt to take them over.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The Canary is a one use system. Once the system has been invaded by a Virus, the canary is abandoned, destroyed, or taken apart and recycled.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Personality

Computer-CT-Liz-Danforth-Traveller-Book-pg-70 19-August-2019b.jpg

A Personality is a Bright to Brilliant Age feature of sophisticated computers capable of high levels of autonomous thought and independent decision-making. [1]

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please see the following AAB Library Data articles for more information:



Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

Brains, Minds & Personalities[edit]

Very advanced computers begin to develop various types of autonomous programming and are referred to with other specialized terms:

Brains, Minds & Personalities
Term Remarks
Brain A Brain is a sophisticated Bright Age Information Technology computer without a significant personality. [2]
Mind A Mind is a sophisticated Bright Age Information Technology computer with a significant personality. [3]
Personality A Personality is a Bright to Brilliant Age feature of sophisticated computers capable of high levels of autonomous thought and independent decision-making. [4]

NOTES: the differences between a brain and a mind are very negligible. There is significant overlap between the definitions, both formally and informally. As a generality, brains are lower performance and minds are higher performance. Brains were first operated without personalities. Later models began to include lower quality personalities. All minds are designed from the onset to include high quality personalities.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Expected Artificial Intelligence Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Marc Miller. "Personalities and Brains." T5 Core Rules (2013): 522-525.
  2. Marc Miller. "Computers, Consoles, and Controllers." T5 Core Rules (2013): 515-519.
  3. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  4. Marc Miller. "Personalities and Brains." T5 Core Rules (2013): 522-525.
 

Point Identity

Imperial-Sunburst-Sun-Scouts-wiki.png

A Point Identity is a consciousness which is cannot move itself from one body to the next while retaining the same identity.

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please refer to the following AAB Library Data for more information:

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Positronic Brain

Computer-CT-Liz-Danforth-Traveller-Book-pg-70 19-August-2019b.jpg

A Positronic Brain is one of the key breakthroughs enabling greater computer processing capability and autonomy in robots.

  • Positronic brains do not yet allow for true artificial intelligence, but more sophisticated models are projected to one day allow that dream.

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please see the following AAB Library Data articles for more information:



Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

  • Lethetic intelligence
  • Bright electronics
  • brains

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Positronic Computer

Positronic Computer
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Predict Program

Target-Program-WH-Keith-CT-Starter-Trav-Pg-40 03-July-2018a.jpg

The Predict Program is designed to use intuitively predictive firing solutions to increase the accuracy of shipboard weaponry. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Offensive programs are intended to allow the use of weapons mounted on a ship to damage or destroy enemy vessels. • Predict is a series of five programs which predict the future position of the target and allow insertion of lead into laser fire. • Predict applies to laser fire (DEW) as well as kinetic fire (KEW), and allows an advantage with use of such weapons. [2]

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Offensive Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [10]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [11]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [12]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  9. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  10. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  11. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  12. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Prototype Brain

Imperial-Sunburst-Sun-Scouts-wiki.png

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

  • Big Blue
  • Cray
  • etc.

Expected Artificial Intelligence Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Superintelligence. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. The text of Wikipedia is available under the Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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Pseudoreality Computer

Pseudoreality Computer
Imperial-Sunburst-Sun-Army-wiki.png
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

A Pseudoreality Computer is a supercomputer simulating the personality of a sophont with advanced AI processors.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Pseudo-reality communications take the form of a life-sized, computer-generated holographic image which behaves and communicates in the same manner as its sender. At TL-15, it is programmed in only a single area of discussion, such as the commissioning of a specific starship design, through the use of extensive questioning and reaction analysis.

A specific program is required for this (5 spaces, Cr 20 000), and the computer must be linked to a pocket Medical Scanner (for reading the subject's reactions to various questions), a voder, and a holocamera. The questioning takes ten to sixty minutes, depending on the complexity of the topic. The final result is a 0.1 data space program which can be run on any computer with an active pseudo-reality (PR) recorder program. The computer then extrapolates from the acquired data and simulates the individual's behaviour. For all intents and purposes it is as though the subject were actually present.

Most Type A starports on X-boat routes have pseudo-reality facilities, with message costs, double that for X-boat messages. At TL-16, neural probes allow the direct copying of an individual's behaviour and memory patterns. Such data programs can behave exactly as the original in all areas, and take up three program spaces.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

At TL-15, computer technology results in pseudo-reality communications.

In this system, an individual's opinions, information, and orders are transferred to a computer program designed to imitate him. This allows a form of communications which lets the individual "be" in any location without actually going there.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Psychotronic Computer

Psychotronic Computer
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type TBD
Tech Level TL–TBD
Cost TBD
Reference TBD
Size TBD
Weight TBD
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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Psychotronics

Wiki Navy.png

Psychotronics are an advanced form of electronics that take advantage of psionic technology.

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please refer to the following AAB Library Data for more information:

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Psychotronics makes use of psychoactive materials and psionic principles that allow higher performance characteristics than conventional electronics limited by physical principle and electromagnetic boundaries.

Selected Pychotronic Devices & Technologies[edit]

  1. Metempsychosis
  2. Mind Control Technology
  3. Neural Activity Sensor
  4. Psi-drug
  5. Psionic Shield Helmet
  6. Psi-Staff
  7. Psion Emitter
  8. Psionic Shield
  9. Psionic Shield Helmet
  10. Psionic Switch
  11. Psionicist Detector
  12. Star Map Projector

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The Zhodani used early forms of psychotronics as early as their TL:10-12 epoch and the Droyne have also used such technology far ahead of their time. Many Ancients artifacts seem to use psychoelectronic technology, which is not well understood by Imperial science.

Psionic Suppressions & Stigmas[edit]

No information yet available.

  • Imperial stigmas and taboos...

Technological Overview of Electronics[edit]

Electronics Generations:

  1. Analogue Electronics (TL:4-6)
  2. Macroelectronics (TL:4-6) (Conventional Electronics or Digital Electronics)
  3. Microelectronics (TL:7-9)
  4. Optoelectronics (TL:10-12)
  5. Myelotronics (TL:13-15)
  6. Claytronics (TL:16-18)
  7. Nanotronics (TL:19-21)
  8. Fuzzy Electronics (TL:19-21)
  9. Atomtronics (TL:22-24)
  10. Psychotronics (TL:25-27)

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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RVO Program

Wiki Navy.png

The RVO Program (Routine Vehicle Operation) software is designed to handle routine shipboard procedures and actions such as landing, taking off, and routine spaceflight. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

The Routine Vehicle Operation program enables the ship's computer to control it in normal operations, especially enroute to or from a jump or breakout point, or in jump space. The program will steer clear of obstacles and respond to simple instructions from traffic control, but will not perform dangerous maneuvers, "push the edge," or dodge in combat. If a situation arises that is beyond its capacity to handle - or t preset intervals or events - the program will sound an alarm and rouse the pilot to take over. [4]

The RVO program is rated as a skilled pilot for normal operations, but its capacity is extremely limited. In an emergency, the RVO program is capable of landing or docking the ship, but a mishap may result in a critical failure or disaster. Pilots are generally considered to be more flexible under most conditions and less critically prone to an escalation of unfortunate events. [5]

An RVO Program may substitute for one mate (...ship's crew member) on a temporary basis (...usually by having the remaining two stand heel-to-toe watches, with the RVO program as backup), but the shortage should be made up as soon as possible. [6]

Automation in 1105[edit]

Automatic Pilot Competency: "Autopilots" - be they robot brains or sophisticated software - can conceivably produce ships cpabl of landing and taking off by themselves, with only general directions from their living crew. This was the logical extension of Terran automation trends before the Interstellar Wars. They unfortunately also have the potential to short-circuit under the most inopportune and dramatic situations. [7] Unfortunately, many parts of Imperial Space developed a taboo against extensive automation and artificial intelligence. [8]

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Routine Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [16]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [17]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [18]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  4. Steve DanielsJim McLeanChristopher Thrash. Far Trader (Steve Jackson Games, 1999), 68.
  5. Steve DanielsJim McLeanChristopher Thrash. Far Trader (Steve Jackson Games, 1999), 68.
  6. Steve DanielsJim McLeanChristopher Thrash. Far Trader (Steve Jackson Games, 1999), 70.
  7. Steve DanielsJim McLeanChristopher Thrash. Far Trader (Steve Jackson Games, 1999), 108.
  8. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  9. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  10. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  11. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  12. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38-39.
  13. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  14. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 39.
  15. Steve DanielsJim McLeanChristopher Thrash. Far Trader (Steve Jackson Games, 1999), 68.
  16. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  17. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  18. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Return Fire Program

Wiki Navy.png

The Return Fire Program is designed to allow quick counterfire against attacking enemy ships. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Defensive programs are used to protect a starship against enemy action.

  • Return fire allows a ship's lasers to fire at enemy ships which fired at the ship in the immediately previous fire phase.
  • Use of this program also requires the target program, and advantages allowed by other programs (such as gunner interact) can be complimentary.
  • If more than one enemy ship is fired on, the multi-target program is also required.

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Defensive Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [7]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [8]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [9]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  9. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Select Program

Target-Program-WH-Keith-CT-Starter-Trav-Pg-40 03-July-2018a.jpg

The Select Program is designed to allow specific, targeted weapon fire, albeit with some drawbacks. [1]

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Offensive programs are intended to allow the use of weapons mounted on a ship to damage or destroy enemy vessels.

  • Select allows a gunner to attempt to choose the part of the target ship he hits. Select-1 and Select-2 increases accuracy against several targets within a designated area, but decreases overall accuracy against the probability of hitting a single target. [2]
  • However, they allow a gunner a one-third chance of hitting the exact area of the target he chooses, if the weapon does hit.

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Offensive Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [10]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [11]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [12]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  9. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  10. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  11. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  12. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

Ship Brain

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

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This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Ship Mind

Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif

No information or synopsis yet available.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Ship's Computer

Computer-CT-Liz-Danforth-Traveller-Book-pg-70 19-August-2019b.jpg

Ship’s Computer: The computer installed on a ship controls all activity within, and is especially used to enhance weapons fire and defensive activity. [1]

  • It is a type of Ship Equipment.
  • It is an object and a technological device, a product of Information Technology. [2]
  • The simple hardiness of ship’s computers makes them extremely durable. [3]
  • Almost all are designed to use lower technology repair components in most functionalities. For this reason, ship’s computers tend to be much larger and more voluminous than strictly function-based microelectronics. [4]
  • Many call them robotic or ship brains. More sophisticated models are called ship minds.

Library Data Referral Tree[edit]

Please see the following AAB Library Data articles for more information:



Description (Specifications)[edit]

A Ship’s Computer also transmits control impulses for maneuver and jump drives, and conducts the routine operation of all ship systems. What the computer actually does is based on the programs actually installed and operating at any one time. [5]

Selected Ship's Computer Types[edit]

  1. Model/1 Computer
  2. Model/2 Computer
  3. Model/3 Computer
  4. Model/4 Computer
  5. Model/5 Computer
  6. Model/6 Computer
  7. Model/7 Computer
  8. Model/8 Computer
  9. Model/9 Computer

Selected Ship's Computer Modifiers[edit]

Computer Control Standards[edit]

Computer Controls: In almost all cases where the ship's computer can control a given ship function (gravity, doors, etc.), orders fed in at the central bridge computer take precedence over those fed in at local controls. Only if the computer is inoperative will a computer override be ineffective.[6] Some ships have been known to be built with a different system set-up, but this arrangement is commonplace on most vessels within Charted Space. [7]

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Ship’s Computers within Charted Space are intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for use under hard vacuum and heavy exposure to cosmic radiation if necessary. [8]

Expected Computer Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

MICRO LEVEL:

Technological Overview of Computers[edit]

Epochal Technological Development: Information Technology is at its earliest conceptual state and slowly grows into mechanical calculative devices to early electronics to the first true computers and beyond.

Information Age Societies[edit]

Technological Period: TL:1-9 and Tech-Name: Ur-Tech
Common Characteristics: Digital Networks, High scarcity, Prototype Nanotech, Calculative ("Calculating machines"), Automatons, Low Autonomous Robots, etc.
Tech Epoch TL-Range Remarks
Tool Making Epoch TL:1-3 COMPUTERS: The abacus and the quipu represent early calculating tech. they are simple, mechanical processors that help a sophont keep large numbers of calculations in memory. Mathematics makes great leaps forward with the development of algebra, trigonometry, and calculus.
Division of Labor Epoch TL:4-6 COMPUTERS: The first analog computers and calculators greatly enhance business and academic endeavors. Mechanical and early electronic calculators become fixtures. Electric devices, polymers, and early electronics fuel continuing progress. Designers use classic Lovelacian programming and aspire to build the first Babbage machines. Many sophont societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/1 and Model/1 bis processors.
Processor Epoch TL:7-9 COMPUTERS: Programmable computers come into vogue as the analog is replaced by the digital. Transistors make way for microchips; desktop processors soon become a feature of home, business, and school. Massive parallel processors fill entire rooms and supersede earlier technologies. The first supercomputers can often beat even expert humans at games like chess due to phenomenal calculating abilities and vast memory banks. Photonic and gravitic energy transmission as well as bio-computing replace many of the earlier generations of electronics. Voice-activated processors are more user-friendly than ever before. Many societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/2, Model/2 bis, and even Model/3 processors.

Bright Age Societies[edit]

Technological Period: TL:10-18 and Tech-Name: Stell-Tech
Common Characteristics: Intelligent Networks, Low Scarcity, Weak nanotech, Synaptic processors, Positronic Brains, Cognitive ("Thinking machines"), High Autonomous Robots, etc.
Tech Epoch TL-Range Remarks
Gravitics Epoch TL:10-12 COMPUTERS: Synaptic processors and positronic brains are vastly more capable than earlier generations of processor technology. Some advanced robots can fool inexpert humans. Expert roboticists call these low autonomous robots. Still, a well-trained expert sophont can often outthink and outperform advanced thinking machines from this epoch. Fluidic and magnetic energy transmission increase processing speed. Semi-organic facility and early ship brains become common. Many societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/4, Model/5, and Model/6 processors.
Biologicals Epoch TL:13-15 COMPUTERS: High autonomous robots outperform many educated experts across many fields. They still can’t match the apex professors, but they can perform perfectly well at the professional level. Holocrystals and advanced bio-compumetrics are increasing functioning to billions of actions per nanosecond. Computer brain implants allow complete rehabilitation and restoration of function to almost all individuals who were formerly handicapped. Infomorphs and downloadable brains supplement wafertech. Pseudoreality simulators show amazing promise. Many societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/7, Model/8, and Model/9 processors.
Artificials Epoch TL:16-18 COMPUTERS: High autonomous robots outperform many educated experts across many fields. They still can’t match the apex professors, but they can perform perfectly well at the professional level. Holocrystals and advanced bio-compumetrics are increasing functioning to billions of actions per nanosecond. Computer brain implants allow complete rehabilitation and restoration of function to almost all individuals who were formerly handicapped. Infomorphs and downloadable brains supplement wafertech. Pseudoreality simulators show amazing promise. Many societies can build processors that meet the Imperial standards for Model/7, Model/8, and Model/9 processors. Hop Drives begin to use more advanced Ship's Computers.

Brilliant Age Societies[edit]

Technological Period: TL:19-27 and Tech-Name: Ultra-Tech
Common Characteristics: Delegative Rule (AI), Post-Scarcity, Strong nanotech, Emotive ("Dreaming or Feeling machines"), Self-Aware Robots, etc.
Tech Period TL-Range Remarks
Ultra Period TL:19-21, TL:22-24, and TL:25-27 It is projected that greater capacity drives will require greater processors. Additionally, ship's computers are projected to become self-repairing at this point requiring only minimal input from the crew. Many technologists believe that these ships will be able to be managed almost entirely by voice command or psionics.
  • It is projected that true Artificial Intelligence will be achieved by this tech epoch, meaning thinking, feeling computers that can match or exceed human or other organic sophont intelligence.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  4. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Jordan Weisman. "Book 2." Adventure Class Ships Volume 1 (1982): 6.
  7. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  8. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
 

Target Program

Ship-Turret-WH-Keith-CT-Starter-Trav-Pg-33 03-July-2018a.jpg

The Target Program is designed to allow accurate fire with shipboard weapons. [1]

  • This is a program, a kind of computer software.
  • It is designed to be used with a Ship’s Computer, although it could be used with other kinds of computers as well.
  • This is a core ship’s computer program and is required in order to use a variety of other computer programs that interact with it.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

Offensive programs are intended to allow the use of weapons mounted on a ship to damage or destroy enemy vessels.

  • Target identifies enemy vessels and and controls all turrets on board ship.
  • It is required for all laser fire and launches except anti-missile fire.
  • It creates fire solutuions, allows remote firing from the bridge, and coordinates all offensive and defensive systems on the ship with sensors and other equipment creating a force multiplier effect. [2]

Selected Computer Programs[edit]

Offensive Programs:

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Software within Charted Space is intentionally built to work under a number of different operating systems, different technology levels of computers, and to be extensively toughened for hard use under vacuum if necessary. [10]

The Software List: The computer software list, available at nearly any software vendor or port, indicates the various programs that are available. It shows space required by a specific program in CPU or storage, its price in MCr, and its title. Also shown is a brief overview of its effects. [11]

Software Authorship: Various requirements exist for individual characters producing existng or new programs. Such a course can save money, but may have some pitfalls. Program generation is explained elsewhere. [12]

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  4. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  5. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  6. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  7. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  8. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  9. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  10. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  11. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
  12. Marc Miller. Starships (Game Designers Workshop, 1977), 38.
 

True Artificial Intelligence

Imperial-Sunburst-Sun-Scouts-wiki.png

A True Artificial Intelligence is a Brilliant Age feature of sophisticated computers capable of independent learning, complete synaptic recall, independent decision-making, and the ability to achieve suprahuman turing test ratings.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

What is true artificial intelligence? It's a very nebulous term, but the greater robotics community uses it to refer to an intelligence capable of making independent decisions, not just following a subroutine or preprogrammed instructions. Different levels of autonomy have been proposed theoretically, and while some incredibly sophisticated robots exist, few scientists believe that true artificial intelligence has NOT been achieved by the known species of Charted Space. Now, the Ancients are an entirely different story. Few precursor studies specialists would propose something that they could not achieve. [1]

Some scientists and roboticists have proposed that the test of reliable synaptic function is the only test of True Artificial Intelligence. [2] A robot with 100% reliable and operationally functional memory recall and self-learning functions would theoretically have no intelligence limitations. There is no limit to the effect of synaptic processing intelligence at that point.[3] Such a robot could truly becoming the ultimate thinking, and even feeling machine being able to match sophontic thought, feeling, and easily pass the Turing Test at suprahuman levels. [4]

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

Expected Artificial Intelligence Development Sequence[edit]

MACRO LEVEL:

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Superintelligence. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. The text of Wikipedia is available under the Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  2. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
  3. Joe Fugate. Robots (Game Designers Workshop, 1986), 10, 37.
  4. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak
 

Turing Test

Imperial-Sunburst-Sun-Scouts-wiki.png

No information or synopsis yet available.

  • AI test

Description (Specifications)[edit]

No information yet available.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Verbal Override

Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif

Verbal Override is a procedure used with computer-controlled security systems, where a specific codeword may be used as absolute identification.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

When used, the codeword bypasses all other identification circuits, and automatically authorizes the presence of the individual concerned.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Primary use of such systems is in the military, where large numbers of individuals may be using the same system.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 

Warning Canary

Warning Canary
Imperial Sunburst-Sun-IISS-Traveller.gif
TBD
Type Sensory Aid
Tech Level TL–10
Cost KCr500
Reference TBD
Size 300.0 liters
Weight 120.0 kg
Manufacturer Various
Also see
TBD

A Warning Canary is a Virus detection device.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

It consists of a high-speed computer specifically designed to look like a large, powerful computer network system. It includes a special set of sensors designed to detect the specific alterations the Virus makes to computers when it takes over a new system.

While the Canary is a is a sophisticated device, it relies upon the nature of the Virus (both curiosity and desire to take over computers) to detect them. If the Virus refuses to fall for the trap set by the Canary, it remains undetected.

These systems are one use only. Once taken over by a virus, they are either abandoned, disassembled for parts, or simply destroyed to kill the viral infection.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Many Reformation Coalition starships install several warning canaries on the network connections between the computer subsystems in order to stop or limit the damage of a Virus invasion.

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

62px-Information icon.svg.png This article is missing content for one or more detailed sections. Additional details are required to complete the article. You can help the Traveller Wiki by expanding it.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

 
,