Hexadecimal Notation

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Hexadecimal Notation is an alphanumeric symbolic representation shorthand or symbolic system. It is the default standard used throughout Charted Space.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

In Hexadecimal Notation, the digits 0 through 9 are represented by the common arabic numbers: the digits 10 through 15 are represented by the letters A through F. The highest single digit in base 16 notation is 15 (F).


Letter Values: Traveller makes extensive use of hexadecimal notation; the letters A through F are used to represent the values 10 through 15 in the base 16 number system. The use of hexadecimal notation allows the presence of a single digit or character to represent a number value greater than 9. The result is greater utility in situations where only a single digit place is available. For example, in the universal personality profile, each of the six personal characteristics is allocated only one place; the letters which represent values greater than 9 can easily fit into those positions.

In many instances, values even beyond 15 (F) are called for. For example, when the number of batteries available on a ship exceeds 15, number values must be assigned to letters higher than F. The following table indicates the corresponding values and letters used in this supplement. Because the letter I and the letter 0 can be confused with the number 1 and the number 0, they are omitted. Using this table, values up to 33 (Z=33) can be expressed.

In cases where values greater than 33 are called for, it is possible to redefine letters toward the end of the alphabet as necessary. Within this supplement, such redefinitions are shown in the universal ship profile. For example, if it is necessary to express the values 40 and 50 when showing the number of batteries, the USP will show (Y=40 & Z=50) to indicate the redefinition of those particular letters. All non-redefined letters in the USP remain as shown on the table below. . [1]

T5 Expanded Hexidecimal System[edit]

Note: The expanded system removes the letters "I" and "O" as they resemble numbers.

Expanded Hexidecimal System
# Symbol Remarks
0 0 Standard Indian numeral
1 1 Standard Arabic numeral
2 2 Standard Arabic numeral
3 3 Standard Arabic numeral
4 4 Standard Arabic numeral
5 5 Standard Arabic numeral
6 6 Standard Arabic numeral
7 7 Standard Arabic numeral
8 8 Standard Arabic numeral
9 9 Standard Arabic numeral
10 A Original hexidecimal notation from Classic Traveller.
11 B Original hexidecimal notation from Classic Traveller.
12 C Original hexidecimal notation from Classic Traveller.
13 D Original hexidecimal notation from Classic Traveller.
14 E Original hexidecimal notation from Classic Traveller.
15 F Original hexidecimal notation from Classic Traveller.
16 G Original hexidecimal notation from Classic Traveller.
17 H Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
I I Not included. Too much like a 1 (one).
18 J Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
19 K Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
20 L Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
21 M Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
22 N Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
O O Not included. Too much like a 0 (zero).
23 P Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
24 Q Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
25 R Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
26 S Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
27 T Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
28 U Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
29 V Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
30 W Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
31 X Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
32 Y Expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.
33 Z End of the expanded hexidecimal notation from T5.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

Hexadecimal Notation has been part of Traveller since its earliest days in the late 1970's CE.

  • As of 2017 CE, T5, the latest version of Traveller from FFE now uses an expanded hexidecinal system known as E-hex.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Hexadecimal. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. The text of Wikipedia is available under the Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. Timothy B. Brown. Fighting Ships (Game Designers Workshop, 1981), page/s 47.