Celsius

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Celsius is the scale of measure for temperature.

  • It is also called the Centigrade scale (centigrade means divided into 100).
  • It is a standard Imperial metric.

Description (Specifications)[edit]

The Celsius scale is a system for measuring temperature. It is divided into degrees (symbol º) and is based around the freezing and boiling points of water (H2O).

  • The standard abbreviation is C.

Temperature Benchmarks[edit]

  • 0ºC is the point at which water freezes (transforms from a liquid into a solid: ice) under an atmospheric pressure of 1 atm.
  • 100ºC is the point at which water boils (transforms from a liquid into a gas: steam or water vapor) under an atmospheric pressure of 1 atm.
  • The lowest temperature that is theoretically possible is -273.15ºC (absolute zero). At this temperature, the motion of particles which constitute heat is minimal.
  • The coronas (outer layers) of stars have temperatures measured in thousands of ºC.

Image Repository[edit]

Celsius Scale.jpg
The Celsius scale. Note that water boils at different temperatures at different atmospheric pressures: the chart above assumes a Standard Atmosphere at a pressure of 1 atm.

Term Usage Example[edit]

The mean surface temperature of Terra, the human homeworld, is approximately 15º Celsius.

History & Background (Dossier)[edit]

The Celsius scale was defined as a means of defining temperature on Terra prior to the foundation of the Terran Confederation: it is named for Anders Celsius, a Terran astronomer born around -2803. Technologists found the Celsius scale useful as the concept of the Technology Level and standardized ideas about sophont society development began to take form.[1]

Image Repository[edit]

No information yet available.

References & Contributors (Sources)[edit]

This article was copied or excerpted from the following copyrighted sources and used under license from Far Future Enterprises or by permission of the author.

  1. An unpublished factoid written by Maksim-Smelchak